Discover more about the exhibitions held at Mall Galleries through interviews with artists, photo essays, prize winners lists and video and audio content. Mall Galleries publish content from all Federation of British Artists Art Society Exhibitions.

New English Art Club Annual Exhibition Prizes & Awards 2021

Spencer-Sarah-Whitstable-Wide-Seascape.jpg

The New English Art Club and Mall Galleries are delighted to announce the Prizes & Awards from the New English Art Club Annual Exhibition 2021. 

Congratulations to all artists who have been awarded prizes by our generous prize givers. 

The exhibition is open at Mall Galleries until Saturday 3 July. 

Book Tickets



If you cannot make the exhibition we hope that with videos, audio, images, and statements by the winners to watch, hear, see, and read, you can experience and enjoy their works wherever you are.

Prizes Winners include:



The Doreen McIntosh Prize

Paul Newland NEAC

The Deanery by the River

A prize of £5,000 to reflect the best in figurative painting in British Art.

The Doreen McIntosh Prize is for an artist whose work fulfils the New English Art Club’s ideals of rigour, immediate engagement with the visual and a searching attitude.

Buy Now


Chris Beetles Gallery Prize for Figurative Art

Cherryl Fountain

At Home with Waggis

£2,500 for a non-member artist. Selected by Chris Beetles of Chris Beetles Gallery, St James's, London

“The Chris Beetles Gallery £2,500 Prize choice is a perfectly observed antidote to lockdown; closeted, cluttered, comfortable and consolingly domestic. 

I have watched Cherryl’s consistent professionalism with admiration for more than 30 years and recommend her to all buyers and exhibiting societies” – Chris Beetles

Buy Now


The Dry Red Press Award

Cherryl Fountain

At Home with Waggis

The winning work will be published as a greeting card in the Dry Red Press 'Prize Winners' range, with royalties from the sale of the cards going to the artist.

Buy Now


The Hermione Hammond Drawing Award

Zuzanna Salamon

I've Been Looking for Someone to Share my Light

£2,000 for a drawing by an emerging artist aged 35 or under


The Bowyer Drawing Prize

Andrew Barrowman

Tree Study

Selected by the Bowyer family, £500

 

Buy Now


The Winsor & Newton Award

Chris Polunin

Space

Art materials to the value of £500

Buy Now


The Peter Ashley Framing Prize

Tim Benson NEAC PROI RP

Daphne, Haringey Resident

Presented by The Artistic Framing Company: A bespoke handmade picture frame will be created for the winning work, to the value of £500

Buy Now


The Michael Harding Award

Sarah Spencer VPNEAC

Whitstable Wide Seascape

£500 worth of art materials

The estuarine coast between Whitstable and Seasalter is a favourite place to paint. It’s a walk I do each day, and the light and weather approaching over mudflats is changeable and always engaging, even on the murkiest of afternoons.

I’m delighted to have won the Michael Harding prize, and it’s particularly fitting that this painting was painted with a considerable amount of Michael Harding’s titanium and warm white oils!

Buy Now


The NEAC Critics' Prize

Richard Pikesley PPNEAC

Eggardon, Cattle and Western Sky

A prize of £250

The location is an iron age hillfort close to where I live in West Dorset. I've walked and painted up here for more than forty years. The high hill gives long views out to the coast running down into Devon. The light here in the moments around dusk is a theme I return to often.

The grazing cattle, which a few minutes before are visually very prominent in the landscape begin to merge with the hillside. I can hear their breath and their chomping at the grass as I shove the paint about trying to make sense of what I'm seeing.

Buy Now


New English Scholar

Nicholas Baldion

A scholarship awarded by the New English Art Club to emerging artists with the most promising portfolios


New English Scholar

Juliet Levy

A scholarship awarded by the New English Art Club to emerging artists with the most promising portfolios.



Book your tickets now

Browse the exhibition online

Empty Chairs in the New English Art Club Annual Exhibition

Ryder-Susan-Garden-Chairs.jpg

An empty chair in a piece of figurative artwork is often representative of the person who would sit in it, so they are, in a sense, a form of portraiture. In addition, a chair is a highly personal object. We form a strong sense of ownership to our items of furniture, and the chair implies rituals. For example, in the family home, each family member may be attached to their chair or sit in a specific spot at a particular time of day.

From the depictions of chairs, we can begin to ascertain a sense of the personality of their owners. This is because the chair acts as a stand-in for a person, characterising what would otherwise be an empty space but reminding us of the potential presence of a human. 

Cherryl Fountain At Home with Waggis Watercolour 90 x 55 cm £1,800

Cherryl Fountain’s At Home With Waggis depicts an empty chair, although the scene is far from absent from life, especially as Waggis the dog sits in the foreground. Fountain explains, ‘Waggis, the last dog my Gamekeeper father trained at the age of 89, is posing obediently for his portrait. The cushion, taxidermy pheasant and game still life on the wall reflect Waggis's (formerly known as Haggis) working career as a gundog. The watercolour depicts him at 16, enjoying his retirement.’ The cushion on the chair tells the viewer about Waggis’s life, and there is so much character and personality in the piece as a whole, reflected in the array of patterned fabrics, colourful ornaments and belongings. Although the work is devoid of human presence, it is far from being devoid of personality. 

Nia Mackeown The Sun Room Chair Oil 38 x 32 cm £395

A lone chair may, however, be representative of loneliness or solitude. It could suggest the owner of the chair lives a life without much companionship. But equally, the singular chair may not necessarily represent unwanted loneliness. Instead, the lonely chair could act as a calming respite after a chaotic day. The chair provides refuge and comfort and shows a commitment to spending time with ourselves. Nia Mackeown’s The Sun Room Chair is incredibly inviting. She writes about her piece: ‘This alla prima painting finds inspiration from the dappled light seen on the Persian rug and antique chair. I enjoyed the play of warm and cool tones within the sunroom and hoped to capture the inviting feeling of the empty armchair.’  How the light skims the edge of the seat calls to the viewer, and we feel compelled to occupy it.

Jason Line Interior with Lloyd Loom Chair Oil 38 x 33 cm £1,200

But a very different atmosphere is portrayed in Jason Line’s piece Interior with Lloyd Loom Chair. Although the chair is similarly pictured next to a window, the trace of presence is still visible. With the paper in the window and crease in the cushion, the overall light is much more gloomy. The grey undertones create a less inviting sense of loneliness and solitude, and our attention is drawn to the presence of absence. Rather than immediately wanting to occupy the lack, the absence is felt, creating a paradoxical portrait of absence. An empty chair can be used to symbolise grief. For example, in the musical Les Miserables, the song ‘Empty Chairs at Empty Tables’ reflects the lack of life or the life that once was, that no longer occupies the chairs. 

However, even in empty chairs, a greater sense of interaction can be felt in depicting multiple chairs at once. For example, in Susan Ryder’s Garden Chairs, her chairs are positioned next to one another to suggest companionship. The chairs, surrounded by the beautiful greenery and flowers, entice the viewer. You can imagine enjoying another’s company as you sit amongst the garden, either engaging in conversation or mutually absorbing your surroundings.

Susan Ryder RP NEAC Garden Chairs Oil 51 x 61 cm £2,100

Jason Line Chair Meeting Charcoal 74 x 94 cm £1,500

But this sense of companionship is not necessarily felt within depictions of multiple chairs. In Adam Stone’s painting Lobby, the sense of absence becomes the centre of attention for the viewer. From the collection of chairs, we may expect to feel a sense of companionship again or be able to imagine the array of conversations that have occurred in this space. Still, through the monochromatic palette, the heavy shadows and lack of signs of human life that could be hinted at through additional objects, the piece feels representative of evidence of long-absent occupants.

Adam Stone Lobby Oil 92 x 114 cm £2,900

Through the context provided in Stone’s description, we learn it is, in fact, an abandoned space; ‘The painting Lobby is of a room in the abandoned Merrion Hotel, Merrion Centre, Leeds. The room had been left untouched for several years after the operators went into liquidation. This work seeks to convey the absent presence experienced in the space. It forms part of a five-year investigation exploring sites of the uncanny within the Merrion Shopping Centre.’

While some of the New English Art Club’s pieces show multi-purpose chairs, others have particular functions. For example, in Rosie Clark’s piece Studio, she depicts the essential chairs to the working day. Drawn in a very technical style with architectural lines and visual guides that accurately portray perspective, the sense of seriousness and purpose is reflected.

Rosie Clark Studio Pencil 66 x 55 cm £525

We can also think more broadly about how we define a chair, as in Christopher Slater’s painting The Old Throne, he depicts a toilet, which is also, in a sense, a chair!

Christopher Slater The Old Throne Oil 50 x 30 cm £585

Lastly, we can think more creatively about chairs, such as in Mary Jackson’s painting Under The Trees, through which she creates an incredibly enticing setting, depicting hammocks hanging from the trees. The golden hues in the light create a warm and welcoming scene, and the viewer can use this painting as a form of escapism. We transport ourselves to a sunny riverside as we imagine ourselves precariously settling into a hanging hammock. So next time you see a depiction of an empty chair, perhaps sit with it for a while.

Mary Jackson NEAC Under the Trees Oil 56 x 71 cm £3,000

The New English Art Club Annual Exhibition runs from 25 June to 3 July 2021

Discover the whole exhibition

Book your timed ticket now

Written by Hannah Martin

Content Image

Ryder-Susan-Garden-Chairs.jpg

Image credit

Susan Ryder NEAC RP, Garden Chairs (detail)

People reading books in the New English Art Club Annual Exhibition

Kinsler website Square.jpg

Books have universally been used to represent knowledge and learning, so we explore artists in the exhibition who have chosen to depict subjects reading.

Kayoon Anderson Studio Scene Oil 88 x 63 cm £2,000

Firstly, in Studio Scene by Kayoon Anderson, she has created a self-portrait in which she is engrossed in a book. Kayoon writes:

"This is a self-portrait in my previous studio - a painting in which to remember the space. The earthy palette reflects how grounded I felt in this small space during the winter months I spent there. The room has an interesting history, having been used by the Adams crime family of Islington. The tape on the window shows where a bullet hole has been covered up."

The earthy tones and the way she describes feeling grounded suggest how comfortable and at ease she felt in the space, a perfect spot to relax into a book!

Norman Long Bookish and Splayed Oil 65 x 65 cm £1,850

Next, we look at Bookish and Splayed by Norman Long. Long explains, ‘Working on this painting over an extended period allowed me to develop a wide range of surfaces through thick applications and glazes. For me, the invented image of the spade in a bucket is symbolic of the man's thoughts, wandering from his book. Or perhaps the hidden lady's thoughts?’

The thick glazes and the textured surface reflects a dreamy, hazy atmosphere that can be felt on the beach during a sunny day, where you escape into the fantasy realm of a book.

Eve Pettitt Lockdown Reading Oil 77 x 57 cm £1,050

Eve Pettitt’s painting Lockdown Reading has an interesting composition. The subject is pictured on a chair directly placed in front of the wall, where the building curves create an unusual alcove. The shape is almost tunnelling and could be reflective of the trapped feeling many of us experienced during the lockdown, where at times, there was little else to do except sit and read a book. Still, the subject’s small smile suggests the enjoyment many felt when we realised we were granted the free time to spend with a book.

Jeannie Kinsler Laura Reading - Tuscan Series Oil 92 x 102 cm £2,700

Next is Jeannie Kinsler’s painting Laura Reading, which is part of her Tuscan series. Kinsler explains ‘This is one of a series of paintings made from a memorable summer family holiday in Tuscany. The late afternoon and evening light was wonderful. I did many sketches and took photographs, working from one of them through last year for this piece which depicts my daughter Laura at the end of a day lying on the floor reading, light flooding through the open door.’

The shadowy patterns and angles of refractive light coming from the open door create quite a fantastical image. The light focuses explicitly on Laura’s eye, showing her single-minded focus on the book, and these magical elements of light could reflect the escapist realm the book has sent Laura to. 

Paul Handley NEAC Victoria Line, Warren Street Oil 45 x 61 cm £1,100

Lastly, Victoria Line, Warren Street, one of Paul Handley’s paintings from the London Underground, shows a collection of people on the tube, finding different ways to occupy their time during their journey. A familiar scene to many of us, whilst some individuals are using their phones; others are looking at newspapers or reading books.

The New English Art Club Annual Exhibition runs from 25 June to 3 July 2021

Discover the whole exhibition

Book your timed ticket now

Written by Hannah Martin

Content Image

Kinsler website Square.jpg

Image credit

Jeannie Kinsler, Laura Reading (detail)

Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours 209th Exhibition | Prizes & Awards Part One

Lawler-Teresa-Haven-6-On-The-Edge-Of-The-City.jpg

The Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours and Mall Galleries are delighted to announce the Prizes & Awards from the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours 209th Exhibition. 

Congratulations to all artists who have been awarded prizes by our generous prize givers. 

The exhibition is open at Mall Galleries until Saturday 29 May. 

Book Tickets

If you cannot make the exhibition we hope that with videos, audio, images, and statements by the winners to watch, hear, see, and read, you can experience and enjoy their works wherever you are.

Artists in Part One include:

Part Two | Prize & Award Winners

Part Three | Prize & Award Winners



The Winsor & Newton Award (£3,000)

Teresa Lawler

Group of works

A cash prize of £3,000

Buy Now


The Winsor & Newton Product Prize

Rika Newcombe

Green Stylus No.1

£1,000 worth of Winsor & Newton art materials

During the first lockdown in 2020, I started drawing new leaves of Jasmine, inspired by the view from my garden studio. I always try a lot of small sketches first and then place them in a grid structure, which became, in this case, “Green Stylus”.

Buy Now


The Leathersellers' Prize

L.C. Cariou

Kew's Princess of Wales Conservatory

£1,000 awarded by The Worshipful Company of Leathersellers to an artist aged between 18 and 30 years old

Buy Now


The James Fletcher-Watson RI Memorial Award

Brian Smith RI

Ernie's Beach

£500 for the best use of watercolour in the exhibition

Buy Now


The Baohong Artists' Watercolour Paper Prize for a Member

Ian Sidaway RI

The Bow River

A Prize of £250

Buy Now


The Baohong Artists' Watercolour Paper Prize for a Non-member

Sarah Granville

Plot 66

A Prize of £250

Buy Now


Part Two | Prize & Award Winners

Part Three | Prize & Award Winners



Discover the whole exhibition

Image credit

Teresa Lawler Haven 6 On the Edge of the City

Frances Bell RP | Winner of The William Lock Portrait Prize

Bell-Frances-Self.jpg

I'm delighted to have been awarded The William Lock Portrait Prize at the Royal Society of Portrait Painters Annual Exhibition 2021.

I'm just going to say a brief word on the portrait that has won the prize...

It's a self-portrait. Self-portraits are always fascinating territory for me, because I think in omitting so many of the influences that typically make up a portrait - the other people, the conversations you have with them, their faces, their ideas, mixed with your ideas lifted onto the canvas - instead of that, you have yourself. You're on your own, you are the sitter and painter. It's a very introspective and sort of circular atmosphere that comes through, and it's quite different for me.

Personally, I always feel that the atmosphere of self-portraits is sort of a spookier, more introspective thing. And I certainly felt that with this one, the largest one I've done. Technically, that was at times complicated. I painted it on the wall, and I have south light here, so it was actually a question of seizing one's moment because south light is a great deal more variable than north. I grabbed my moments over about a three week period. The posing was a bit difficult, trying to concentrate on the painting, but also managing to fall into the right pose. However I hugely enjoyed it. It is always fascinating, as always a voyage, a bit of a different journey. 

I can't believe that the painting has received recognition, let alone in such company, so I'm absolutely over the moon. Thank you very much.

- Frances Bell RP

 





 

 

Juicy Pears in the RI Watercolours Annual Exhibition

Ford-Wayne-Autumn-Glory.jpg

Pears might be less populist than apples, but they have been immortalised in paint for thousands of years. They are considered symbols of longevity, abundance, good health, and happiness. As well as reminiscent of the female form and women’s fertility.

Can we read these symbols into the paintings of pears in the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours 209th Exhibition?

Lillias August RI Two Fat Pears Watercolour, 19 x 33 cm (38 x 50 cm framed) £800

Buy Now

Lillias describes this as “Two ripe pears leaning on each other” – they certainly look like old friends to me. ‘Two Fat Ladies’ enjoying each other’s company and support.

"Most of my still life paintings are set up in my studio with light from a window on my right. Although the subject matter is what inspires me, the backgrounds and shadows are some of the most important parts of the painting as they enhance and compliment the subject matter itself.  On the technical side, I nearly always start with the background and shadows, move on to the subject and then dance between the two, building up their relationship until I think it works and they are 'speaking to each other'." - Lillias August RI

Helen Davison Pears Watercolour & gouache, 38 x 28 cm (40 x 50 cm framed) £1,200

Buy Now

Helen Davison’s Pears offers us four views of pears, some in pairs, some alone. They seem to work as a sort of storyboard – the new pear brought home from the Grocers, nestled in a paper bag, introduced to the others in the fruit bowl until she is eaten! But even then she seems to know how to show off her figure, using the brown paper bag like a feather boa.

Wayne Ford Autumn Glory Watercolour, 25 x 38 cm (47 x 60 cm framed) £1,400

Buy Now

Wayne Ford’s Autumn Glory certainly speaks of abundance and fruitfulness. The bowl you took to gather pears from the tree wasn’t big enough, you wrapped some more in a cloth, but still you couldn’t carry all the tree had to offer. You put these down just inside the door as you grabbed a large basket to head back out.

Shirley Trevena RI Fruit & Flowers on a Cream Cloth Watercolour & graphite pencil, 41 x 41 cm (59 x 58 cm framed) £1,200

Buy Now

Shirley Trevena RI has included pears in three of her Still Lifes. With jugs and vases of flowers, these pears, on their elevated fruit stands, seem to sing of abundance and harvest time pleasures.  

Shirley Trevena RI Kitchen Still Life Watercolour & graphite pencil, 38 x 35 cm (57 x 52 cm framed) £1,200

Buy Now

Shirley Trevena RI Blue China & Green Apples Watercolour & graphite pencil, 30 x 36 cm (48 x 50 cm framed) £450

Buy Now

Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours 209th Exhibition runs 20 to 29 May

Discover the whole exhibition now

Content Image

Ford-Wayne-Autumn-Glory.jpg

Image credit

Wayne Ford, Autumn Glory (detail)

Royal Society of British Artists Prize & Award Winners 2021 | Part Four

Hodgson-Brian-Lockdown-3.jpg

The Royal Society of British Artists and Mall Galleries would like to congratulate all prizewinners and give a special thank you to all our prize-givers. 

Though the gallery is now re-open, this year's prize-giving is exclusively online. But with videos, audio, images, and statements by the winners to watch, hear, see, and read, you can experience and enjoy the prize-winning works wherever you are.

If you can't make it to the gallery you can discover the exhibition via our virtual tour.



The Prize Winners featured in Part Four include


The Geoffrey Vivis Memorial Award

Joseph Dupré

A Miracle Called Horace

A prize of £100

Buy Now


The Winsor & Newton Painting Award

Brian Hodgson

Lockdown 3

Art materials to the value of £500

Buy Now


The John Lynn Commemorative Award for a Young Artist

Owain Hunt

Man in Red Chair

A prize of £500

Buy Now


The Arts Society Star Student Award

Charlotte Crosby

Grandad

Art shop vouchers to the value of £100


RBA President's Star Student Award

Coco Huang

Deadly Sins

A prize of £100



The Royal Society of British Artists Prize & Award Winners Part One

The Royal Society of British Artists Prize & Award Winners Part Two

The Royal Society of British Artists Prize & Award Winners Part Three


Discover the exhibition

Royal Society of British Artists Prize & Award Winners 2021 | Part Three

Price-Stephen-Contemplation.jpg

The Royal Society of British Artists and Mall Galleries would like to congratulate all prizewinners and give a special thank you to all our prize-givers. 

Though the gallery is now re-open, this year's prize-giving is exclusively online. But with videos, audio, images, and statements by the winners to watch, hear, see, and read, you can experience and enjoy the prize-winning works wherever you are.

If you can't make it to the gallery you can discover the exhibition via our virtual tour.



The Prize Winners featured in Part Three include


The Ronald Morgan Memorial Award

Roger Cromwell

Storm Passing

A prize of £250

"I think the popularity of these exhibitions at Mall Galleries is because there are people painting pictures which people want to see, paintings that painters want to do.

I think there's a growing interest in this kind of painting; young people now choose to go to ateliers to learn art because they are taught the craft of painting, which you cannot get at conventional art school.

So I think Mall Galleries is an important institution for showing this kind of work. And I believe it's on the rise. I am very, very privileged and happy to be part of that."

Buy Now


The Patron's Prize (Joint Winner)

Stephen Price

Contemplation

Buy Now


The Patron's Prize (Joint Winner)

Callum Stannard RBA

Artist's Mother

Buy Now


The Stuart Southall Print Prize

Will Taylor RBA

Blackfriars

A prize of £250

Buy Now


The Surgeon's Prize

Andrii Kateryniuk

Sunset in the Cypress Grove

A prize of £500



The Royal Society of British Artists Prize & Award Winners Part One

The Royal Society of British Artists Prize & Award Winners Part Two

The Royal Society of British Artists Prize & Award Winners Part Four


Discover the exhibition

Royal Society of British Artists Prize & Award Winners 2021 | Part Two

Owusu-Achiaw-Samuel-Citrus-In-Manibus.jpg

The Royal Society of British Artists and Mall Galleries would like to congratulate all prizewinners and give a special thank you to all our prize-givers. 

Though the gallery is now re-open, this year's prize-giving is exclusively online. But with videos, audio, images, and statements by the winners to watch, hear, see, and read, you can experience and enjoy the prize-winning works wherever you are.

If you can't make it to the gallery you can discover the exhibition via our virtual tour.



The Prize Winners featured in Part Two include


Frinton Frames Award & The Gordon Hulson Memorial Prize

Paula Mitchell

Solent Sparkle

The Frinton Frames Award is a £200 award of picture framing at Frinton Frames bespoke handfinished picture frame makers

The Gordon Hulson Memorial Prize is a £250 prize for draughtsmanship, variety & exploration


Hahnemuhle Fine Art UK Award

Samuel Owusu Achiaw

Citrus in Manibus

A prize of artist paper, worth £250

Buy Now


The Michael Harding Award (I)

Steven Outram RBA

Fire and Dust

An award of £500 worth of Michael Harding art materials

Buy Now


The Michael Harding Award (II)

Paul Slater

Sons of Borias

An award of £500 worth of Michael Harding art materials

"Many thanks to the Royal Society of British Artists for including my work in their annual exhibition. 

Thanks too go to the ‘Brothers Borias’ [the subject of my painting] for bringing good fortune as they did to ‘Fineas,’ in the story of ‘Jason and the Argonauts.’ It was they, the sons of the god of the north wind, who used their power of flight to relieve the forlorn ‘Fineas’, of a pesky infestation of Harpies. My good fortune has been to win The Michael Harding Award, which is wholly unexpected and greatly appreciated. 

Michael Harding Oil Colours are the best and I have been using them exclusively for many years so you can imagine how happy I am to have received this honour. 

Thanks again to all concerned and I promise to attempt to make good use of the generous award” - Paul Slater

Buy Now


The Peter Kelly Commemorative Prize

Mark McLaughlin

Flood and Ice, Belair Park, West Dulwich

Buy Now



The Royal Society of British Artists Prize & Award Winners Part One

The Royal Society of British Artists Prize & Award Winners Part Three

The Royal Society of British Artists Prize & Award Winners Part Four


Discover the exhibition

Royal Society of British Artists Prize & Award Winners 2021 | Part One

Gillbanks-Emily-Three-Things.jpg

The Royal Society of British Artists and Mall Galleries would like to congratulate all prizewinners and give a special thank you to all our prize-givers. 

Though the gallery is now re-open, this year's prize-giving is exclusively online. But with videos, audio, images, and statements by the winners to watch, hear, see, and read, you can experience and enjoy the prize-winning works wherever you are.

If you can't make it to the gallery you can discover the exhibition via our virtual tour.



The Prize Winners featured in Part One include


The de Laszlo Foundation Prize

Emily Gillbanks

Three Things

The de Laszlo Medal for Excellence and £1,500 awarded for the best artwork from life by an artist aged 35 or under.

Buy Now


The Artist Magazine Award

Meg Dutton VPRBA

Inside the Glasshouse

The winner will be interviewed in The Artist magazine, print and digital editions

"Observational drawings - and a fascination with pattern and detail in both the natural and man made world form the basis for this large etching and watercolour.

I produced sketches and line drawings of the Tropical House interior at Kew Gardens, -- and also shapes and patterns of plants and flowers.

I kept these drawings for a long long time and pondered on how I might use them in a work.

Eventually, a final composition was constructed from many of these drawings --- with some artistic licence on the positioning of the plants!

This compilation drawing was transferred to a zinc etching plate, printed, and then painted with watercolours" - Meg Dutton VPRBA

Buy Now



Nathan David Award for Sculpture

Lesley Hilling

The Soldier

A £150 prize for sculpture

"The Soldier" by Lesley Hilling from Ionised Media on Vimeo.

 

Buy Now


The Dry Red Press Award

Margaret Foreman

Seaside Festival Tulips

The winning work will be published as a greetings card in the Dry Red Press 'Prize Winners' range, with royalties from the sale of the cards going to the artist

 

Buy Now



The Royal Society of British Artists Prize & Award Winners Part Two

The Royal Society of British Artists Prize & Award Winners Part Three

The Royal Society of British Artists Prize & Award Winners Part Four


Discover the exhibition

Image credit

Emily Gillbanks Three Things (detail)