Exhibition updates

Discover more about the exhibitions held at Mall Galleries through interviews with artists, photo essays, prize winners lists and video and audio content. Mall Galleries publish content from all Federation of British Artists Art Society Exhibitions.

Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours 208th Exhibition Prizes & Awards Part Three

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The Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours (RI) and Mall Galleries are pleased to announce the prizewinners at this year’s RI 208th Exhibition, the largest exhibition of contemporary water-based media paintings in the world. 

With the exhibition online this year, the winning works were chosen from the gallery’s website rather than its walls.

However with videos, audio, images and statements by the winners to watch, hear, see, and read, we hope you can experience and enjoy their works wherever you are.

Discover all the prize winners via the links below

The prize winners featured in part three include:


The Baohong Artists' Watercolour Paper Prize for a Member

Lillias August RI

Tied Up in Knots

I’ve done many paintings of everyday things and what could be more ordinary than string? Usually when I paint rows of objects I hang them up by pieces of cotton so that they are right in front of me when I work. I often don’t paint the cotton and the pictures end up looking like I’m looking down on the objects on the floor. This time I left those bits of cotton in as they seemed to tie in with the subject so well. So what could be more ordinary than bits of string collected over the years - all have done their job and been discarded but were essential at some point. Different textures, different colours, different shapes, different sizes - what could be more interesting to paint and what will the whole thing mean to those that look at it?


The Baohong Artists' Watercolour Paper Prize for a Non-member

Juliette Losq

Aisle

I depict marginal landscapes that spring up in the overlooked borderlands of cities and towns. These become sites of speculation on what might have gone before and what may be occurring out of sight.

I allude to the Picturesque and the Gothic of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, interweaving their motifs and devices with the marginal areas that I depict. I aim to evoke an uncertain world hovering at the edges of a symbolic ‘Clearing’, where wilderness and chaos oppose civilization and order, and in which beauty and neglect are interchangeable.

'Aisle' shows part of the semi-derelict boatyard on the Thames.  Compositionally, and through the depiction of light, the scene reminded me of certain Vermeer paintings.


The Cass Art Prize

Martha Zmpounou

Christian

Part of a series of artworks and face studies, 'Christian' is the portrait of an Italian friend from Syracuse, Sicily. Created through multiple layers and washes, the aim was to develop the painting by continuously responding to the medium’s inherent qualities; its fluid and seemingly transparent nature.

This process involved embracing and incorporating accidental bleeds into the outcome, as well as leaving areas of the painting ‘undone’, to some degree, while working in more detail in others.

The objective was to capture the apparent imperfections of the skin and its fragility, echoing the fragility and transient nature of emotions, as well as subtly convey the introspective element in Christian’s look, a mix between melancholy and contentment.


The Chaoshan Watercolour Award

Tianya Zhou RI

Prayers



Discover all the prize winners via the links below


Browse the whole exhibition now



 

Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours 208th Exhibition: Prizes & Awards Part Two

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The Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours (RI) and Mall Galleries are pleased to announce the prizewinners at this year’s RI 208th Exhibition, the largest exhibition of contemporary water-based media paintings in the world. 

With the exhibition online this year, the winning works were chosen from the gallery’s website rather than its walls.

However with videos, audio, images and statements by the winners to watch, hear, see, and read, we hope you can experience and enjoy their works wherever you are.

Discover all the prize winners via the links below

The prize winners featured in part two include:


The Schmincke Prize

Emma Hollaway

Found Paintings 2.1

‘Found Paintings 2.1’ is a work from an ongoing series. Returning to watercolours after several years, I opened my palettes to find collections of forgotten paintings in the lids. As a way of reconnecting with the medium, I turned to painting these paintings.

Painting with watercolour on dry paper was once described to me as a staining process, and I enjoyed the literal parallel with the stains on the set itself. This well-used school watercolour set is the fourth in the series. The paintings in its lid remember unknown works of art that this little set helped create.  


The President's Choice Award

Lucy Pulvers

Self Portrait 1


The Richard Plincke RI Prize for Colour

Paul Murray

Winter Memorials

Winter Memorials is a painting of a view of the surrounding landscape of the cemetery where my father is buried in Gourock just West of Glasgow. Although I say a painting, I see it more as a composition using gouache, collage and drawing.

The initial composition is developed from sketches of the shapes and textures of the gravestones and memorials. It is created through layers of brushwork, collage of patterned and pre-painted paper and mark making as they move between the abstract and the representational.

The objects and their negative space are only the starting point: I allow the textures and marks to dictate what happens next.


The Debra Manifold RI Memorial Award

Presented by the Linda Blackstone Gallery

Lisa Graa Jensen RI

Deep Midwinter

‘Deep Midwinter’ is one of a winter series. The three paintings are syndicated out for use as cards. The initial idea came during a freezing cold snowy walk one day in February on the North Downs in deepest Surrey with my dog, when three deer raced across the fields in front of us... really beautiful. Snowy Peace, then Snowy Land and finally Deep Midwinter came from that snowy walk.


The John Purcell Paper Prize

Faye Bridgwater

140 Monochrome Studies of Sussex



Discover all the prize winners via the links below


Browse the whole exhibition now



 

Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours 208th Exhibition: Prizes & Awards Part One

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The Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours (RI) and Mall Galleries are pleased to announce the prizewinners at this year’s RI 208th Exhibition, the largest exhibition of contemporary water-based media paintings in the world. 

With the exhibition online this year, the winning works were chosen from the gallery’s website rather than its walls.

However with videos, audio, images and statements by the winners to watch, hear, see, and read, we hope you can experience and enjoy their works wherever you are.

Discover all the prize winners via the links below

The prize winners featured in part one include:


The Winsor & Newton Award (£3,000)

George Butler

Delhi Market

This work developed because I have always wanted to work bigger than a sketchbook. In situ, in the market outside the mosque in the heart of Delhi, I drew on separate sheets of paper, trying not to worry about whether they fitted together.

I drew over two days and then collected ephemera from the surrounding market stalls to help piece the work together. It is more a composite of characters, black kites and the scene - a memory, for me more accurate than a photograph. 


The Winsor & Newton Product Prize

Day Bowman

Storage Facility 2

These are the post-industrial edgelands that fringe our cities and towns.

I have set out to investigate how and why we travel the landscape: through cities and suburbs; retail parks and parking lots; edgelands and endless motorways.

The paintings represent snapshots of journeys across such landscapes by train or car, bicycle and bus or ferry across a river; journeys that criss-cross the land and our daily lives which we absorb, acknowledge or ignore. 


The Leathersellers' Prize

Suzon Lagarde

Suzy

'Suzy' was my first painting of 2020. Gouache is a medium I love going back to. I find it to be a fantastic bridge between drawing and painting. It's based on a photograph from my childhood, a precious source of inspiration for me. I painted it in a period where I found myself quite down and anxious, but I remember the joy I got from creating this tiny self-portrait as if I was reconnecting with the playfulness and calm present on this day, over twenty years ago. 


The James Fletcher-Watson RI Award

David Howell PPRSMA

The Ghats at Udaipur

This painting comes from an original pen and watercolour sketch made on the steps of the ghats in Udaipur early one morning, when the women came down to do their washing. I loved the contrast of the bright colours of the saris against the cool of the water and I worked quietly in the background to avoid disturbing what was clearly a social event. I loved the hazy morning light before the heat of the day burnt it away and the contrast of the domed pillars against the deep shade of the background trees..


The Megan Fitzoliver Brush Award

Deborah Walker RI RSMA

Be Still

It's easy to be moved by an aerial panorama of the sparkling Thames at sunset or to feel the exhilaration of crashing waves on a beach, but there is a different kind of magic to be found in secluded backwaters.

The inspiration for 'Be Still' is from such a place near to my home in Staffordshire. I like to walk at the end of my working day, to breathe and clear my head. It's a quiet time.

A favourite walk is at the far side of my village around tree-lined lakes where I've become interested in the water's edge.

My favourite conditions are depicted in 'Be Still' when there is almost no movement on the surface.

While noticing the spacing of the reeds and their seductive reflections, I'm also aware of the surface tension and below, where reeds have fallen and sunk to create a basket that cradles the whole. 'Be Still' is about looking, being present in the moment, noticing the small stuff and it makes me almost hold my breath.


The Anthony J Lester Art Critic Award

Claire Sparkes RI

The Seed That Loki Planted

‘The Seed That Loki Planted’ combines elements of Norse Mythology and Indian culture to realise a personal mythology. The model’s hair was a particular inspiration for this piece. Like roots take nourishment for the growing plant above, so the hair interweaves with symbolic objects, which infuse the flowering figure.

Strands of hair dip into the wells of knowledge within the books, alluding to the roots of the Norse World Tree Yggdrasil and the three wells into which they descend.

The richly embroidered Indian throw underpins the painting. It’s intricate patchwork references layered history, and its intense colour brings lifeblood to the story. My watercolour palette expanded in the process of capturing these vibrant colours.


Discover all the prize winners via the links below


Browse the whole exhibition now



 

Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours: President's Foreword

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Rosa Sepple, President of the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours. 

I welcome you to the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours (RI) 208th exhibition in a slightly different way than planned. It is now 189 years since its foundation, and this will be the first where the exhibition is “opened” in this manner. I do wish that you all stay safe and heed the advice given by health officials and government.

The RI was originally called the New Society of Painters in Water Colours and it held its first exhibition in 1831 under the patronage of Queen Adelaide with the aim of promoting artists who were not affiliated to any ‘Society’. Invitations were circulated amongst artists and this first open exhibition was held in Old Bond Street with 118 painters submitting works.

This year we have had contributions from North America, Europe and Asia. 459 artists submitted 1096 works online which included not only a record number of young ‘Emerging Artists’ but also a record number of artists wishing to become members. Please take time to look around the virtual exhibition. This is the largest exhibition of its kind in Europe and includes 444 paintings, 196 of which are from non-members.

Claire Sparkes RI Still Life on a Ledge

Congratulations and a big welcome must go to our two new members, Claire Sparkes and Zi Ling. Both of them have a unique approach to painting that will add a new and exciting dimension to our shows. 

Zi Ling RI Dream of Platybelodon

Our immense gratitude must also go to Winsor & Newton and The Leathersellers’ Company for their continued support and to all those who give so generously every year by supplying us with prizes. We are fortunate to have an additional prize this year - ‘The President’s Choice Award’ of £750. 

Above all, our thanks must go to all the artists who have contributed their amazing paintings, to the Chief Executive Officer, Clare O’Brien, and everyone at the Mall Galleries for their help and support. I would personally like to thank my amazing Council for their support and contribution over the past year making this one of the most respected art institutes in the world today.



Discover the exhibition now

Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours & Young Artists

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Each year at the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours exhibition at Mall Galleries, a £1,000 art prize is awarded by The Worshipful Company of Leathersellers to an artist aged between 18 and 30 years old. 

Below, Jean Noble RI explains the importance of the prize and what it means for the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours. 


The Leathersellers Prize aims to encourage young artists between the ages of 18 and 30 to think of submitting work to our open exhibition. Winning can make an enormous difference. Not just receiving the money, but galleries take a look at artists being thought worthy of such awards. 

George Butler Demolition 

Kate Morgan won the prize four years ago. Since, she has become a member of the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours and had a very successful solo show at Panter & Hall. Her work, which lends itself to pattern making, was taken up by H&M Childrenswear in 2019. A summer range of clothes was made from her jungle designs for boys and girls. 


In 2019, the prize was won by Junwei Dai, who says:

"The Leathersellers’ Prize is absolutely a big encouragement for me to keep exploring the possibilities of watercolour! I really appreciate this prize, especially for young artists. I feel young artists can’t get recognised fairly in many countries where social networking speaks rather than the artworks. That is the motivation for me to join international exhibitions like the RI, Royal Watercolour Society, American Watercolour Society and National Watercolour Society."


I 'stalk' the internet constantly looking for new talent to encourage. I visit studio and gallery spaces where young artists are showing their work. It is so important that we give a platform for these young people to show their work. And, as importantly, we must get young people interested in art societies for the future of every Society.

In the 2020 exhibition, we have 44 pieces being hung from young, emerging artists.

Over the last 6 years, The Leathersellers' Prize has been won by a variety of artists. Winning in itself can mean, amongst other things:

  • Experimenting with new materials
  • Getting their work shown in a new venue
  • More framing opportunities 

Suzon Lagarde Siblings

Winning a prize and being able to tell galleries of an award can increase their standing within the art world. Encouragement in the arts is so important in this digital world.

It is so important that if art societies are to exist, that we encourage the young and emerging artists who do not always choose watercolour as their medium of choice! 

This year, the prize was won by Suzon Lagarde for her work Suzy


For your chance to exhibit alongside members of the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours, please visit our Call for Entries or subscribe to our newsletter below.

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Discover the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours 208th Exhibition

 

Image credit

Suzon Lagarde Suzy (detail)

Around the World with the RI – Interactive Map

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A box of watercolours and a few brushes are infinitely transportable. A pocket-sized sketchbook and something wet to dampen your brushes is all one needs to paint wherever inspiration strikes.

Emma Hollaway Found Paintings 2.1  Watercolour & pencil 24 x 33 cm £550

For the artists in the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours 208th Exhibition, inspiration has struck at points all over the face of the Earth. From bustling metropolises to remote country cottages, from the Shetland Islands to the Canary Islands, we can travel with the painters of the RI from the comfort of our own homes.

Click on the pins in the map below to see paintings from every corner of the globe.

The Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours 208th Exhibition is exclusively online.

Browse & Buy the Exhibition Now

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Chris Myers RBA RI, Winter Market Trafalgar Square

Down on the Farm

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With almost 70% of the UK’s land used for agriculture, it is no wonder that so many of the artists exhibiting in the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours 208th Exhibition have created images of farmland or livestock.

Now that we have all seen empty supermarket shelves with our own eyes, the vital importance Farmers have in keeping us all fed and well is obvious. What better time to celebrate their hard work?

Colin Allbrook RSMA RI Sunlight in the Shed Watercolour & bodycolour, 65 x 85 cm, £2,000

Colin Allbrook RSMA RI is showing a collection of watercolours that focus on the everyday life of the farms around him in Devon and Cornwall, including images of cattle in their cow sheds and sheep in the fields.

Colin Allbrook RSMA RI The Old Bull Watercolour & bodycolour, 65 x 85 cm, £2,000

Colin Allbrook RSMA RI Welcome Sunshine Watercolour & bodycolour, 46 x 62 cm, £1,200

Colin Allbrook RSMA RI Winter on Dartmoor Watercolour & bodycolour, 35 x 43 cm, £495

Sheep safely grazing are also the inspiration for paintings by David Parfitt RI and Lisa Graa Jensen RI.

Lisa Graa Jensen RI A Country Walk Acrylic inks, 45 x 45 cm, £850

David A Parfitt RI Slate Fence and Sheep Watercolour, 59 x 64 cm, £1,100

There is an increased awareness of the positive role that farmers can play in wildlife conservation and many of these images celebrate the huge biodiversity that can be found in field margins.

Edward Stamp RI March Headland Watercolour, 54 x 45 cm, £750

Neatly ploughed fields and their teaming hedgerows are Edward Stamp RI’s focus for many of his works in the show.

Edward Stamp RI March Morning Watercolour, 61 x 47 cm, £775

Ann Blockley RI treats us to a closer view of life in the hedgerow.

Ann Blockley RI Caught in the Brambly Hedge Mixed media, 85.5 x 66.5 cm, £1,650

Tony Hunt RI has reduced the ploughed fields down to beautiful geometric symmetry.

Tony Hunt RI The Barley Mow Acrylic, 88 x 67 cm, £1,400

Rukiye Garip Memories Watercolour, 95 x 75 cm, £3,000

For Karen Read Coley the memories of the farm are also a recurring theme in her work: "These paintings are nearly always based on the memory of the farm next door to where I grew up - Distant farm buildings set on top of rising farmland with a meandering track up the hill to reach them."

Karen Read Coley The Distant Farm Water-based media, 44 x 44 cm, £490

And because 'man shall not live by bead alone', let's also celebrate the Fishermen bringing us home fish when the boat comes in.

Jane Hodgson says of the inspiration behind her painting: "Four of these men cram themselves into a tichy dingy for their life on the high sea."

Jane Hodgson Choppy Sea - Putting Out Nets Ink & watercolour, 67 x 68 cm, £465

The galleries might be closed but you can view the entire Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours 208th Exhibition online. Most works are for sale, with prices starting at £350.

View the RI's 208th Exhibition online now

Mall Galleries is a not-for-profit Charity and any purchase you make goes to support the artist themselves as well as helping us to continue to offer artists a platform on which to exhibit and sell their work.

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Lisa Graa Jensen RI A Country Walk

Watercolours Hanging Out to Dry

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It intrigued me to spot several paintings in this year’s Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours 208th Exhibition depicting a washing line, writes Liberty Rowley, Marketing Manager at Mall Galleries. 

It got me thinking. Thinking about what seeing a line full of washing blowing gently in the breeze makes me feel, and why so many painters have painted it as a subject.


Geoff Butterworth A Day Like Any Other Pure watercolour, 74 x 57 cm, £1,800

Geoff Butterworth says it “sums up the mundane life of the times”. His painting is titled A Day Like Any Other, but for those of us who grew up in a world of tumble dryers and city living, it seems another time and place. A time and a place where the air was cleaner, you didn’t fear your neighbours stealing your socks, and the sun always shone. He describes this painting as showing “Beautiful light, gritty reality.” 

So, thinking again, the time and the place, in this case the Lancashire border towns in the Pennines of several decades ago, is one that is easy to view through rose-tinted nostalgia goggles, but the reality for many was ‘gritty’. At the heart of the Industrial Revolution, some of Lancaster’s population was rich, but more were extremely poor.

The tenement houses depicted were built for families working long hours down mines and in mills, and then much of that industry departed. 

Geoff Butterworth says he is using his watercolours to “record the northern scene as it is today, emerging from its grimy industrial past.”

 

Anne Ware’s Windy Day, Boulby Works also looks to grimy industry.

Anne Ware Windy Day, Boulby Works Watercolour, 50 x 62 cm, £640

The potash mine at Boulby, North Yorkshire is just a smudge on the horizon and almost the whole scene is filled with sunshine and clean sheets. The barefoot blonde hanging out the washing gives the impression of a rural idyll, far removed from the mine shafts and underground laboratories of the Works over her shoulder.

Washing hanging on the line starts to seem a comfortable, welcoming and almost universal sign of sunny domesticity. Andy Lee’s Colourful Old Houses, Sospel, Provence shows washing hanging from the balconies in the south of France.

Andy Lee Colourful Old Houses, Sospel, Provence Watercolour, 58 x 78 cm, £1,500

Kate Bentley’s Fresh Warm Linen could be almost anywhere in the world. The universality of the sight of a woman hanging out the washing is emphasised in also not being able to tell what period in history this particular scene is taking place.

Kate Bentley Fresh Warm Linen Pure watercolour, 53 x 65 cm, £895

In David Howell’s painting of a Hindu temple in Udaipur, we can see a line of brightly coloured clothing hung out to dry, giving a jolly as well as homely feel to this scene that could otherwise seem remote from my everyday experience.

David Howell PPRSMA Rada Krishna, Udaipur Watercolour, 51 x 43 cm, £1,550

Likewise, Paul Banning's Hanging Out the Washing, Trinidad shows what to me is the srange activity of hanging the washing underneath the house. Chattel houses are built to be movable, so home owners could disassemble, move and rebuild their houses where they could gain employment.

Paul Banning RI RSMA Hanging Out the Washing, Trinidad Watercolour, 25 x 30 cm, £900

Rosa Sepple’s Venice is draped with washing lines, giving a pleasant overtone of domestic bliss to the city known for romance, flirtation and debauchery disguised behind Venetian masks.

Rosa Sepple PRI Lavanderia Watercolour, gouache & ink, 28 x 76 cm, £2,450

Rosa Sepple PRI Venice I Watercolour, gouache & ink, 56 x 76 cm, £4,250

Julija Skudutyte’s depictions of domestic washing lines are a little less idyllic.

She explains: “These works are depictions of the home of an older lady in Lithuania, who is a hoarder."

Julija Skudutyte Mindset Watercolour, 90 x 120 cm, £2,900

“It has become a norm amongst older people in Lithuania. After independence from the Soviet Union was won, some mindsets, like living in the Culture of Poverty (terminology started by O. Lewis), have stayed. 

For these seniors, everything needs to be kept just in case they will need it one day, and it's important for them not to use anything new because ‘why buy something new when you have an old thing that is still working’.

They want to keep the unused things for their children even though after they are dead the children always throw everything out. 

The money is not important because in Soviet times even if you had the money you just couldn't buy anything. Objects had more value than money. You couldn't really have anything nice because the government would be suspicious that you had contact abroad.

It's hard for people who are living in this mindset to change. They are not rich, neither are they poor, but they still live as if they are victims and have no choice.”

Julija Skudutyte American Beauty Watercolour, 95 x 75 cm, £1,900

“This particular lady collects plastic bags. After using them, she washes them and then leaves them to dry out. After they are dry she folds them and puts them in a pile next to other plastic bags. That‘s why I chose to call this artwork American Beauty, after the 1999 film directed by Sam Mendes. 

The best-known scene from the film is a plastic bag dancing in the wind as Thomas Newman's soundtrack is playing in the background. That scene really was a perfect connection to the old lady who is collecting those plastic bags because it looks as if she wants to collect all that beauty and have it to herself.”


I hadn’t expected the simple washing line to speak to me so powerfully of social and political history. Nor to link me with so much familiarity and recognition to people spread all across the world. 

But that’s why art is exciting. 

What will you find in the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours 208th Exhibition that will surprise you?

Visit the exhibition from 2 to 17 April, 10am to 5pm (closes 1pm on final day) Closed on Easter Sunday, 12 April. 

Admission £5, Free for Friends of Mall Galleries.

View the RI's 208th Exhibition online now

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Image credit

Rosa Sepple PRI, Lavanderia

Royal Society of British Artists Prize & Awards: Part Three

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Prizes from the Royal Society of British Artists Annual Exhibition 2020 were awarded at the Private View held at Mall Galleries on Wednesday 19 February in front of a packed Main Gallery. The exhibition was opened by Will Gompertz, BBC Arts Editor and author. 

The Royal Society of British Artists and Mall Galleries would like to congratulate all prize-winners and give a special thank you to all our prize givers. 

Discover all of the prize winners via the links below:

The Prize Winners featured in Part Two include:


The Ronald Morgan Memorial Award

Pauline Hazelwood

Sweeping Steps

Barbers at Borough Market, smart stripes and catching the customer too. 


The Stuart Southall Print Prize

Richenda Court

Behind the Human Ocean

'Behind the Human Ocean' is a linocut which depicts 'The Girl' rising from the ocean. The image is inspired by line drawings from my book 'Ocean Swell' which tells the story of a couple who meet under the ocean. 


The Surgeon's Prize

Tara Versey

Another Late Afternoon by the Old Wall


The Geoffrey Vivis Memorial Award

Will Taylor RBA

Waterloo Sands


The Winsor & Newton Painting Award

Mark Fennell

The Diagnosis

I painted this self-portrait with palette knives soon after being diagnosed with Lymphoma. I think it reflects how I felt at the time.

The Whistler Award

Ronald Morgan RBA ROI

For his works in last year's exhibition



The Royal Society of British Artists Prize & Award Winners Part One

The Royal Society of British Artists Prize & Award Winners Part Two

Discover the exhibition now

Image credit

Will Taylor RBA Waterloo Sands (detail)

Royal Society of British Artists Prizes & Awards: Part Two

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Prizes from the Royal Society of British Artists Annual Exhibition 2020 were awarded at the Private View held at Mall Galleries on Wednesday 19 February in front of a packed Main Gallery. The exhibition was opened by Will Gompertz, BBC Arts Editor and author.

The Royal Society of British Artists and Mall Galleries would like to congratulate all prize-winners and give a special thank you to all our prize givers. 

Discover all of the prize winners via the links below:

The Prize Winners featured in Part Two include:


The Dry Red Press Award

Bess Harding

Stolen Stem X

A single stem, stolen from a neighbour's garden, taken out of its natural environment only to be unceremoniously taped to a wall and painted. A delicacy, transience and beauty captured in what the viewer knows will be its last few moments of life.


The Michael Harding Award (I)

Chris Aggs RBA

Apple Blossom


The Michael Harding Award (II)

Anthony Yates RBA

Succulent Night


The Gordon Hulson Memorial Prize

Daisy Sims-Hilditch

Studio Contre-Jour

Painted in Oils, this little picture is of my "painting table". I love how the light bounced off the surfaces of mirrors and bottles of turpentine as well as the contrast between light and dark creating interesting shapes. I squinted a lot whilst painting this to saturate the values of light and dark which I hope creates an interesting piece. 


The Peter Kelly Commemorative Prize

Stuart Robertson

Notre Dame de Paris

Painted in the studio in watercolour and some gouache with elements of collage.


The Patron's Prize

Jon Pryke RBA

Wheeling Moon



The Royal Society of British Artists Prize & Award Winners Part One

The Royal Society of British Artists Prize & Award Winners Part Three

Discover the exhibition now

Image credit

Bess Harding Stolen Stem X