Q&A with the Prize-Winners of the ROI Annual Exhibition 2021

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ROI Annual Exhibition 2021 | Q&A with the Prize-Winners

The Royal Institute of Oil Painters and Mall Galleries would like to congratulate all prizewinners and give a special thank you to all our prize-givers. 

 

Watch our Q&A with the Prize-Winners!



View the ROI Exhibition 2021


The Royal Institute of Oil Painters Prize & Award Winners 2021

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The Royal Institute of Oil Painters and Mall Galleries would like to congratulate all prizewinners and give a special thank you to all our prize-givers. 

 

We do hope you are able to visit the exhibition to experience the prize winning works in person, but if not, the exhibition is also available to browse with works available to purchase online.

View the ROI Exhibition

The Art Academy Portrait Prize

Belinda Wrigley

Scarlet Clouds

The opportunity for a student at The Art Academy to have their work included in the ROI Annual Exhibition.

The Artist Magazine Award

Rob Pointon ROI

Piccadilly Flow

The winner will be interviewed in The Artist magazine, print and digital editions

 

 

The Le Clerc Fowle Medal

Stewart Beckett

For an outstanding group of works.  ‘Mirror Mirror’, ‘Red Bag’ and ‘The Edge of The Fall’.

In memory of Anne Le Clerc Fowle, presented annually for an outstanding group of paintings.

 

 

The Dartington Crystal Chalice

Adebanji Alade VPROI

In recognition of outstanding service. Introduced in 1995, the Dartington Crystal Chalice is presented annually to a member in recognition of outstanding service and contribution.

 

 

The Dry Red Press Award

Michael Alford

Eastbound, Piccadilly

To be published as a greeting card by Dry Red Press in their 'Prize Winners' range.

 

 

The Alan Gourley Memorial Award

Amanda Coleman AROI

Dad

An annual prize of £1,000, awarded for a painting of outstanding merit.

 

 

Frank Herring Easel Award

Adam Ralston

Awarded for all his works ‘Blackpool Bathers’, ‘North Pier Light’ and ‘Studio Table’.

An award of a versatile easel.

 

 

The Tony Merrick Memorial Prize

Sarah Freeman

Awarded for all her works ‘Clogs’, ‘Green Crocs’ and ‘Plate of Tunnocks’

An award of £250 in memory of the late Tony Merrick ROI (1948-2018).

 

 

Menena Joy Schwabe Memorial Award

Luis Morris ROI

Awarded for all his works ‘Ada Turning Away’, ‘Ada With Arms Outstretched’, ‘Ava’ and ‘Cristina’

An award of £250 for an outstanding oil painter.

 

 

The Small Painting Prize

Tom Marsh ARSMA

Evening Light, Fields, Battle, E. Sussex

An award of £250, open to members and non-members, for the best small painting on display (maximum dimension of 12 inches / 30.5 cm, excluding frame)

 

 

Winsor & Newton Non-member Award

Paul Heredia

Mirror Test 15.6.21

Non-member Award - £150 worth of Winsor & Newton Fine Art Materials

 

 

Winsor & Newton Young Artist Award: Third Prize and The ROI Emerging Artist Prize

Max White

‘Tenby's North Beach, August Morning’ (Winsor & Newton Award) and ‘Evening Sun after Storm, Regent Street to Piccadilly’

Winsor & Newton Third Prize: £400 Winsor & Newton Fine Art Materials for artists aged 30 or under and the ROI Emerging Artist Prize: A prize of £250 and the opportunity to spend a day with one of the Institute's members, for an artist aged 30 or under at the time of submission.

 

 

Winsor & Newton Young Artist Award: Second Prize

Ruth Fitton

Grace, at Dusk

For artists aged 30 or under - Second Prize: £600 Winsor & Newton Fine Art Materials.

 

 

Winsor & Newton Young Artist Award: First Prize

Hanie Soltani

Still Life in Time

For artists aged 30 or under - First Prize: £1,000 Winsor & Newton Fine Art Materials

 

 

The Phyllis Roberts Award

Jie Zhuang

One Day in the 1980s

An award of £2,000 for an artist aged 30 or under

 

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ROI Prize-winning artists encourage you to enter your work

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The Royal Institute of Oil Painters are currently seeking work for their 2021 Annual Exhibition, and artists are invited to submit work to exhibit alongside members of the society. 

The ROI are calling for oil paintings of all subjects and in any style, and there are a number of prizes and awards available to be won. We would really love to encourage you to submit your work, especially if you are an emerging artist, even if you haven’t exhibited your work within a prestigious gallery before. The Annual Exhibitions attract an array of contemporary artists, art collectors and enthusiasts, so it is a wonderful opportunity to get your work seen and to raise your profile!

Hannah Martin spoke to some of the previous prize winners from the Royal Institute of Oil Painters Annual Exhibition 2020, about their experience of submitting work alongside members, and how the exhibition benefited them.

Owain Hunt - Emerging Artist Prize Winner 2020

Owain Hunt Lockdown Man 

I asked Owain what he would say to encourage someone who is unsure about submitting their work and he said:

"Entering a society exhibition is a great way to gain exposure early on in your career. Alongside the obvious benefits of showing your work in central London, the whole process, from submitting your work, to attending the Private View is a great way to immerse yourself in the ongoings of the respective FBA societies and the Gallery itself."

Owain told me that a lot of exposure came from winning the Emerging Artist Prize and he received several sales enquiries and has gained a lot of clients via the gallery. 

Michelle Anderson - Tony Merrick Memorial Prize

Michelle Anderson Fieldspan

Michelle said it was a thrill to get accepted initially, and then to win a prize was totally unexpected and a wonderful surprise. She said having her painting in the exhibition meant she gained exposure and a wider appreciation of her work. She would encourage any talented painters to apply saying "Have a go, you never know!"

Ruth Fitton - Winsor & Newton Young Artist Winner 2020 (and Emerging Artist 2019)

Ruth Fitton Self Portrait in Miniature

I asked Ruth what she thought about submitting to the exhibition and she explained: "It's really important to just go for it. Don't second-guess yourself or worry about your work fitting in - it's so important to be you, and submit the pieces which speak most to you personally. I would also add that the ROI is a very friendly society - this is a group of people who just love to paint. If you love to paint, then this is the competition for you!"

Ruth was the Emerging Artist prize winner in 2019 which she said gave her a huge confidence boost and changed her whole perception of herself as a painter. She then won the Winsor & Newton Young Artist Award in 2020, and purchased £1000 worth of paint with her prize money, she said "it’s wonderful to suddenly have the freedom to use enormous amounts of paint!"

Ruth went on to say: "showing work and winning awards with the ROI has dramatically increased my confidence in myself as an artist, empowering me to try new things and inspiring me to keep going."

Daniel Roy Sharples - Dry Red Press Award Winner 2020

Daniel Roy Sharples Bridesmaid

Daniel won the Dry Red Press Award last year, meaning his painting was published as a greeting card by Dry Red Press and is available to buy on their website. Daniel said: "they were very friendly when liaising with me about the design and printing process. I receive a royalty fee every year from Dry Red Press and received 24 complimentary greeting cards that I could use to send to clients and promote myself."

Immediately after winning the award, his painting Bridesmaid was also sold which he said was a nice bonus! Exhibiting and winning the award gave Daniel positive publicity and he was able to promote himself successfully across social media and it also gave him the confidence boost he needed to keep producing work he enjoys. The experience inspired Daniel to keep on pursuing his career as an emerging artist.

I also asked Daniel what he would say to encourage someone who is unsure about submitting their work and he responded: "I would say that it’s definitely worth the effort. Knowing that your work might be selected and exhibited in a prestigious exhibition like the ROI makes you up your game. You want to enter your best work. Even if your work isn’t selected, you will have at least pushed yourself to make more artwork and develop your skills and experience as an artist."

We hope that reading these encouraging statements from previous prize winners inspires you to submit your own work for the ROI Annual Exhibition 2021. Take a look at all the guidelines and information.

Enter your work now

The deadline to submit your work is Friday 10 September, 12 noon. We can’t wait to see what you create!

Article and interviews by Hannah Martin

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Image credit

Daniel Roy Sharples, Bridesmaid (detail)

Reflections from the Artist | Adebanji Alade VPROI

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You must have a healthy, wholesome view of yourself, your works and what you can uniquely bring into the art world and be true to it!


Adebanji Alade VPROI on his favourite work in the Royal Institute of Oil Painters Annual Exhibition 2020, his favourite art supplies store and the greatest asset an artist can have. 

Adebanji Alade VPROI Grey, Rainy, Gloomy Day, London

You and the ROI

Why did you want to join the Royal Institute of Oil Painters?

I wanted to join the ROI because I love the oil medium and I wanted to belong to a society that parades the best artists in the medium.

Why should artists want to exhibit with the Royal Institute of Oil Painters?

It is a great opportunity to get your work recognised and seen alongside some of the best painters in the oil medium today.

Why should people want to buy art from the Royal Institute of Oil Painters?

People should buy art from the ROI because you know for sure you are getting work from some of the best painters in the oil medium today. 

Trevor Chamberlain ROI RSMA Winter, Oak Trees in the Snow

Past or present, which artist from the ROI do you most admire?

For me, it’s Trevor Chamberlain. I’ve courted his works in books way back when I was in Nigeria. I love his consistency over the years and even after eight decades, his quality is still up there with the very, very best!

What is your favourite work in this year’s exhibition?

My favourite work in the exhibition is David Curtis’ piece titled, “Diffused Light, Jermyn Street”.

He uses a limited palette with such dexterity that it almost looks like he has used a full-blown palette, yet the mood atmosphere of this piece still comes across so vividly. It’s a masterpiece!

David Curtis ROI RSMA Diffused Light, Jermyn Street

Your Materials

What paints make up your palette? 

I couldn’t do it without them!

What framer do you use and do you always use the same framer? 

Two framers, Joe Alexander & Bijan!

Joe Alexander is a master framer with great precision and finishing.

Bijan is experienced in everything frames, I’ve used him since 1999.

What is your favourite art supplies store? 

My favourite supply store is Cass Art - they’ve taken way too much of my money but I get quality in return.


You, Your Work and Your Studio

What gallery did you first sell work at? When was it? How much did it sell for?

The first gallery to sell my work in London was the Mall Galleries. It was in 2006 at the Royal Society of Portrait Painters and I can’t remember how much it sold for (£400 according to our records).

It was titled, “The People I Sketch Every Day on Public Transport”

Where do you produce your best work? Do you work en plein air and finish in the studio?

I produce my best work on the go - sketches and plein air.

But then the more refined gallery work is started and finished in my studio. 

Adebanji Alade VPROI Too Early....?

Do you have any rituals or routines when preparing and starting a painting? 

Yes, I pray to God for inspiration - a touch of the Divine.

Where is your studio and what’s it like? / Can you describe your studio space?

My studio space is in Chelsea on Lots Road, it is a cluttered treasure of an organised junkie, filled with sketchbooks, paintings, books and over 500 art magazines!


Advice

What advice would you give a young artist starting out or wanting to join the ROI?

You are making the right decision. Oil is the most respected medium in the world and when you introduce yourself into the art world as a member of such a prestigious society you instantly gain respect and the doors of opportunity are bound to open for you! At least they did for me since being elected a full member in 2015!

What do you know now that you wish you’d known at the start of your career?   

I wish somebody had told me to believe more in myself and not let self-doubt consume me.

I believe self-confidence is the greatest asset any artist can have, once it’s gone, there’s not much you can do in a world where a million artists are all splashing their stuff on social media and galleries....and if you are not careful, you’ll compare yourself with too many and be swamped into complete utter despair. 

You must have a healthy, wholesome view of yourself, your works and what you can uniquely bring into the art world and be true to it!



'Reflections from the Artist' is an ongoing series of reflection, advice from and insight into the practice of artists who exhibit at Mall Galleries. 

Discover the full series here.

Next Up... Derek Daniells AROI


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Reflections from the Artist | David Pilgrim ROI

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"Ken Howard is one of my painting heroes and as a young artist, I was inspired by his work and delighted in reading his books. His work is so uplifting."

David Pilgrim ROI on selling his first work at university, his Royal Institute of Oil Painters hero and the joys of painting en plein air. 

David Pilgrim ROI Low Tide, Treen Cove

David Pilgrim is a British painter with a passion for painting ‘en plein air’ which also compliments and informs his studio practice. Working on location, he strives to capture the very essence of that moment and create a personal response to the subject with energy and economy. In 2012, David was elected a full member of the Royal Institute of Oil Painters


You and the ROI

Why did you want to join the Royal Institute of Oil Painters?

I’ve had a passion for oil painting for many years and to me the ROI has always represented the highest of standards in oil painting. Many artists who I have long admired were members and upon entering for the first time back in 2006 (was it really that long ago!) I was delighted to discover what a friendly and open society the ROI really is.

Why should artists want to exhibit with the Royal Institute of Oil Painters?

The ROI represents the very best in oil painting today and it feels a great privilege to be able to exhibit with fellow oil painters of such a high calibre. There is a great tradition and history behind the society but we are also very forward-thinking and mindful to attract and showcase exciting new talent, irrespective of any style or genre.

Why should people want to buy art from the Royal Institute of Oil Painters?

Buyers have the opportunity to purchase art from a diverse pool of artistic talent, ranging from well-established ROI members to emerging and new artists in the public submissions. The ROI has no ‘house style’ and aims to showcase the best work in oil painting today so there should be plenty of diversity to suit buyers’ tastes.

Ken Howard OBE Hon RBA PPNEAC RA ROI Logan Rock £5,000

Past or present, what artist from the ROI do you most admire?

Ken Howard is one of my painting heroes and as a young artist, I was inspired by his work and delighted in reading his books. His work is so uplifting and I share Ken’s passion for working tonally and painting the light. His work ethic and dedication to painting is an inspiration to us all.

What is your favourite work in this year’s exhibition?

Such a tough question, there are so many paintings that could be my favourite! I love the Reflected Sunset by Tim Benson PROI as it has such a powerful economy and harmony whilst evoking the essence of that beautiful sunset with such wonderful strokes of paint. A joyous painting!

Tim Benson PROI NEAC RP Reflected Sunset £2,000

Your Materials

For plein air work outdoors I tend to rely on oils using my Open Box-M (I have both the 12x16in and 11x14in models) mounted on a sturdy tripod. I use mediums such as Michael Harding oil paint medium, Roberson’s Glaze medium and pure turpentine in varied combinations and consistencies. Favourite brushes tend to be from Rosemary & Co together with Cornelissens hogs.

What paints make up your palette?

I prefer Winsor and Newton Artist Quality Oils on the whole but augment the range with a few additional colours from Michael Harding (e.g. Naples yellow which has a slightly deeper tone than Winsor and Newton).

David Pilgrim ROI Setting Sun over the River Ouse, Passenham £875

Do you frame your own work?

I tend to hand finish frames that I have made by my local framers in Stony Stratford (Skills Art Materials). I have a selection of preferred mouldings and use emulsion paints (sometimes with gilding wax) to achieve the final finish which is always sealed with polished finishing wax.

What is your favourite art supplies store?

It’s a tie between Jacksons and Cornelissens!


You, Your Work and Your Studio

What gallery did you first sell work at?

I think my first official sale was from my final year exhibition at Aberystwyth University in 1997. At the time I was inspired by Scandanavian interior artists such as Villhelm Hammershoi and painted the interior of a disused academic building, very much focused on the light and the quiet stillness within. The painting was titled ‘Between Two Rooms’ and I think it sold for something like £280 which seemed a lot to me at the time as a student!

Where do you produce your best work?

Outdoors on location, ideally by the sea!

David Pilgrim ROI Towards Gwynver, Sennen Cove £1,395

Do you have any rituals or routines when preparing and starting a painting?

I always lay my palette out in the same order and it tends to run from dark and cool on the left to warm and light on the right.

Where is your studio and what’s it like?

My current studio is a converted bedroom in a Victorian house with good high ceilings and north facing windows.


Advice

What advice would you give a young artist wanting to join the ROI?

Get involved as much as you can, the best learning is by doing and by showing your work you can get some invaluable feedback. Interact with other artists you admire, ask questions, be curious and build on your passions. Be prepared for difficulty/setbacks and don’t compare or judge yourself too harshly against others. Enjoy your painting and find your own unique voice.

What do you know now that you wish you’d known at the start of your career?

I wish I had discovered the joys and benefits of plein air painting earlier in my painting career.



'Reflections from the Artist' is an ongoing series of reflection, advice from and insight into the practice of artists who exhibit at Mall Galleries. 

Discover the full series here.


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Reflections from the Artist | Haidee-Jo Summers ROI RSMA

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"It’s a great encouragement when artists whose work you admire so much select your painting to hang in the exhibition, and then a real thrill and a boost to see it up on the wall at the private view"


Haidee-Jo Summers ROI RSMA on selling her first work at the Royal Institute of Oil Painters, her studio space and developing an abundance mindset

Haidee-Jo Summers ROI RSMA White Lilacs, Stocks and Apple Blossom, £2,100

You and the ROI

Why did you want to join the Royal Institute of Oil Painters?

I first heard about the society when I was in my early twenties and was encouraged by a member to enter. That first time I entered I won a prize in the young artists' award and from then on I dared to hope that one day I might become a member. It became my driving ambition.

Why should artists want to exhibit with the Royal Institute of Oil Painters?

It’s a great encouragement when artists whose work you admire so much select your painting to hang in the exhibition, and then a real thrill and a boost to see it up on the wall at the private view.

I’ve seen time and again how the members are so warm and encouraging to new exhibitors. It’s a wonderful thing to be a part of the ROI show.

Haidee-Jo Summers ROI RSMA Herd Immunity £2,000

Why should people want to buy art from the Royal Institute of Oil Painters?

We are showing the best work of the year by many of the UK’s best oil painters, and have a fantastic array of subject matters and styles on display with a wide range of sizes and prices.

There are so many paintings to love, the hardest thing is narrowing down your choices!

Past or present, what artist from the ROI do you most admire?

This is a hard question because all my contemporaries are outstanding and it’s difficult to pick just a few! Past members I would say Laura Knight, Dorothea Sharp and Walter Sickert of course, plus Tony Merrick who is so much missed.

Of the current membership, Ken Howard and David Curtis have been the most inspirational to me. I should add Peter Brown for being such a powerhouse and Adebanji Alade who keeps everybody encouraged and smiling!

What is your favourite work in this year’s exhibition?

Can I pick two? Ice cream by Craig Lee and Paddy by Adam Ralston. Apart from being beautifully painted they both have that warm nostalgia for summers gone by and hopefully the summers yet to come when we get through this strange time!

Craig Lee Ice Cream £549

Your Materials

What paints make up your palette?

I use Michael Harding and Winsor & Newton Artists range mainly, but also some Old Holland, Rembrandt and Gamblin.

Do you frame your own work?

I used to hand paint all my frames but now I have a couple of framers and the frames arrive ready for me to pop the paintings in. I worked at a framer many years ago so I don’t mind doing the fitting part at all.

What is your favourite art supplies store?

It’s Jacksons Art that I always turn to. Living quite remotely in Lincolnshire they always seem to have everything I need and I love their bespoke oil primed linen canvasses. But my brushes always come from Rosemary & Co.


You, Your Work and Your Studio

What gallery did you first sell work at?

I did little local exhibitions straight after graduating and around the same time I had my first success exhibiting with the ROI in 1997 and the painting sold. It was around £300 (we've checked our records and it was £575!) which seemed like an absolute fortune to me, probably a month’s wages at the picture framers. 

All the other paintings I was selling at that time would have been priced between £20 and £100. I really wish I knew who bought that painting so I could have thanked them!

Haidee-Jo Summers ROI RSMA Vintage Caravan Sink

Where do you produce your best work? Do you work en plein air and finish in the studio?

I produce most of my work en plein air so I have to say that’s my best work, although I am really keen to explore other avenues in the studio, such as paintings being composed of many layers of paint as a contrast to the one shot alla prima ones.

I’d also like to do larger work outside in multiple sessions. There’s so much more I need to challenge myself with.

Do you have any rituals or routines when preparing and starting a painting?

Well in the studio I start the morning with a coffee and lighting the woodburning stove which is a lovely way to start to the day.

When I’m ready to start painting I put my apron on and that means business.

Where is your studio and what’s it like?

My studio is in our garden in Lincolnshire. It’s a huge 1970s concrete workshop which we’ve extended and remodelled to make a dry, well-insulated, airy space with a high ceiling and painted wooden beams and lots of windows.

I also have a mezzanine level at one end which is where I sit and read or sketch or work on my laptop with the cat and dog in front of the fire.

I paint from a model up here when I can, and have lots of fun props and cheerful fairy lights. I’m so lucky to have all this wonderful space to myself and I love it to bits.

Haidee-Jo Summers ROI RSMA Late Afternoon, Cherry Blossom

Advice

What advice would you give an artist wanting to join the ROI?

Have faith in your own voice and follow the ideas wherever they take you. Don’t try to emulate anybody else, we want to hear your authentic voice. When you paint what gets you fired up it shows in the work and that’s really exciting for us to see.

Save your best work throughout the year, put it to one side so that you’re not caught out when submission time rolls around again.

And I would say reach out to us members on social media or face to face at events and private views. We are a friendly bunch I promise, and we’ve ALL been in your shoes and want to help and encourage you.

What do you know now that you wish you’d known at the start of your career?

I learned early on that it was important to put your work forward and enter exhibitions and competitions. Don’t expect to always be selected or win a prize, just keep putting it out there and persevere. Celebrate the highs, shrug off the lows, there’s always another chance around the corner.

The other thing I’m glad I realised early on in my career because it was a big shift for my thinking, is that there really is enough room in this art world for all of us. You don’t want to waste your energies feeling envious of others success, there are plenty of opportunities for all.

They call it an abundance mindset and it’s well worth cultivating one!

Discover the Royal Institute of Oil Painters Annual Exhibition 2020



'Reflections from the Artist' is an ongoing series of reflection, advice from and insight into the practice of artists who exhibit at Mall Galleries. 

Discover the full series here.

Next Up... David Pilgrim ROI


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Image credit

Haidee-Jo Summers ROI RSMA So Light is Her Footfall

Reflections from the Artist | Tim Benson PROI NEAC RP

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"I absolutely love the work of Luis Morris, I think he has the deftest of touches with the brush and he insinuates rather than spells things out."

Tim Benson, President of the Royal Institute of Oil Painters on the need for a cup of tea, a deep breath and a few stern words with himself. 


You and the ROI

What does the Royal Institute of Oil Painters mean to you?

For me, the ROI represents the best oil painters working in the UK today and I wanted to show alongside them.

Why should artists want to exhibit with the Royal Institute of Oil Painters?

To bring your work to the attention of some great artists and a very wide audience. There is also a real sense of achievement when you see your work up on the walls (or website) at Mall Galleries.

Why should people want to buy art from the Royal Institute of Oil Painters?

There really is something for everyone on display. We don’t champion one style of painting over another.

Past or present, what artist from the ROI do you most admire?

I absolutely love the work of Luis Morris, I think he has the deftest of touches with the brush and he insinuates rather than spells things out.

Luis Morris ROI Man with an Owl

What is your favourite work in this year’s exhibition?

So many to choose from but if pushed I would say ‘Rooftop View of St Petersburg’ by Thomas Arthurton. It is a beautifully balanced, economical piece of painting that is simultaneously unassuming and jewel-like.

Thomas Arthurton Rooftop View of St Petersburg

Your Materials

What paints make up your palette?

I use ‘Winton’ by Winsor and Newton, Cass Art Oils and ‘Georgian’ by Daler Rowney.

I have the same 7 colours on my palette for any painting:

  • Cadmium Red
  • Lemon Yellow
  • Burnt Umber
  • Alizarin Crimson
  • Ultramarine Blue
  • Cobalt Blue
  • Titanium White

Tim Benson PROI NEAC RP Summer Stream

Do you frame your own work?

I frame my smaller paintings and any that are painted on board. I’ve used the same framer for years because he is a master craftsman and crucially, offers a great service!

What is your favourite art supplies store?

Cass Art in Islington.


You, Your Work and Your Studio

What gallery did you first sell a work at?

Vertigo in Great Eastern Street, Old Street in 2001, £1,000.

Where do you produce your best work?

I wouldn’t say that my best work happens in any given environment; I’ve produced paintings that I’m very happy with en plein air and in my studio. I don’t, however, work outside and then finish off in my studio, all work is done in one hit.

Tim Benson PROI NEAC RP Reflected Sunset

Do you have any rituals or routines when preparing and starting a painting?

A cup of tea, a deep breath and a few stern words with myself.

Where is your studio and what’s it like?

My studio is in Wood Green, North London. It’s about 10 minutes walk from my home so really convenient. It’s a small, modest room in an ex-council office block. It’s not pretty but it does the job!


Advice

What advice would you give an artist wanting to join the ROI?

Submit work that you believe in, not something that you think would ‘fit’.

What do you know now that you wish you’d known at the start of your career?

That we’re all in this together and that good things come to those who wait.



'Reflections from the Artist' is an ongoing series of advice from and insight into the practice of artists who exhibit at Mall Galleries. 

Discover the full series here.

Next Up... Haidee-Jo Summers ROI RSMA


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New English Art Club Annual Exhibition 2020 | Prizes & Awards

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The New English Art Club and Mall Galleries would like to congratulate all prizewinners and give a special thank you to all our prize-givers. 

With videos, audio, images, and statements by the winners to watch, hear, see, and read, you can experience and enjoy the prize-winning works wherever you are.

The exhibition is open at Mall Galleries until Wednesday 16 December.

Book Tickets to the Exhibition



Chris Beetles Gallery Prize for Figurative Art

Lyn Gray

Hermione at Home

£2,500 for a non-member artist. Selected by Chris Beetles of Chris Beetles Gallery, St James's, London.

Chris Beetles, Director, Chris Beetles Gallery:

"I had not been aware of the work of Lyn Gray before and on looking over her profile online find that my choice is not serendipitous. She has a lively and spontaneous way with paint and stimulates consistently one’s imagination by investing her subjects with distinct personalities.

'Hermione at Home’ is an artwork handled with dash and panache and skilfully rendered form. Lyn Gray has captured an element of personality in her sitter which arrests attention.

The artist shows us that Hermione is an old lady comfortable in herself and whose direct gaze interests and charms us. She is an enduring and strong image for our difficult times.” 


The Hermione Hammond Drawing Award

Merlin Bateman-Paris

Jen Looking Up

£2,000 for a drawing by an emerging artist aged 35 or under

Buy Now


The Bowyer Drawing Prize

Jason Line

Study for Bottles and Buildings

A prize of £1,000

Buy Now


The Winsor & Newton Award

Ruth Stage NEAC

Cardoons in a Kentish Garden

Art materials to the value of £500

Buy Now


The Peter Ashley Framing Prize

Nicholas Baldion

Self Portrait

Presented by The Artistic Framing Company: A bespoke handmade picture frame will be created for the winning artwork, to the value of £500


The Dry Red Press Award

Caroline Frood NEAC

Heleniums

The winning work will be published as a greeting card in the Dry Red Press 'Prize Winners' range, with royalties from the sale of the cards going to the artist

Buy Now



Discover the whole exhibition now

Image credit

Lyn Gray Hermione at Home

Reflections from the Artist | John Walsom ROI ARSMA

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"If you paint in oils, this is the ultimate shop window for the best that the medium has to offer. To get a chance to exhibit alongside such artists is invaluable."


John Walsom ROI ARSMA on working en plein air, his advice for young artists entering Open Exhibitions and selling his first work for a fiver.

John Walsom ROI ARSMA Cavell Street £3,200

John is renowned for his paintings of landscapes and architectural subjects. He is a council member of the Royal Institute of Oil Painters and an associate member of the Royal Society of Marine Artists. When he's not painting he's the guitarist in the soul band The Detectives.


You and the ROI

Why did you want to join the Royal Institute of Oil Painters?

For a long time, going to the annual ROI exhibition, I felt like a kid pressing my nose on a toy shop window -  so many beautiful, unattainable things. There’s no more profound compliment than the approval of your heroes, which is why I was so happy to have been made a member.

Why should artists want to exhibit with the Royal Institute of Oil Painters?

If you paint in oils, this is the ultimate shop window for the best that the medium has to offer. To get a chance to exhibit alongside such artists is invaluable.

Why should people want to buy art from the Royal Institute of Oil Painters?

You can be confident that the paintings in this exhibition are the best works of some of the finest oil painters in the world, or have been selected by them to be worthy of sharing the same walls.

Past or present, what artist from the ROI do you most admire?

I'm in awe of all the current members.

What is your favourite work in this year’s exhibition?

Linda by Jane French is a painting I could look at for a long time, it has enormous compassion and warmth while using paint in a confident skilful way.

Jane French Linda

Your Materials

What paints make up your palette?

Mostly Winsor & Newton and Michael Harding, depending on which shop I can get to.

Do you frame your own work?

Nowadays I make most of my own frames, up to about 30 x 40 inches. I previously used Period Frames in Surbiton, who I can strongly recommend for affordable hand-finished frames.

John Walsom ROI ARSMA Commercial Road, E1 £3,200

What is your favourite art supplies store?

I'm lucky to have a studio right across the road from Pullingers Art Shop in Kingston. They've always been helpful and knowledgeable.


You, Your Work and Your Studio

What gallery did you first sell a work at?

In 1977 I had a regular pitch every Sunday on the railings of Kensington Gardens, on the Bayswater Road.  I sold my first painting there for £5, and I've still got the fiver.

Where do you produce your best work?

Most of my oils are completed en plein air, and I think I paint better under the pressure of working on the spot. 

Sometimes I do some "adjustments" later in the studio, usually to emphasize some darks which looked strong when they were wet, in the daylight, but sink in a bit as they dry, and under indoor light.  I also make bigger studio versions of some of these.

John Walsom ROI ARSMA Under the Fallen Trees £4,800

Do you have any rituals or routines when preparing and starting a painting?

Only to make sure I'm excited about the subject, otherwise, I can realise halfway through that my heart's not in it, and it's best to start another.

Where is your studio and what’s it like?

It's an office space over the shops in the middle of Kingston. It's much too small.


Advice

What advice would you give a young artist starting out?

Persevere. Don't think that not being selected is a rejection of your work, most members spent years having their first work accepted.

What do you know now that you wish you’d known at the start of your career?

Painting outdoors speeds up your pace of learning by several times. 


Discover the Royal Institute of Oil Painters Annual Exhibition 2020



'Reflections from the Artist' is an ongoing series of reflection, advice from and insight into the practice of artists who exhibit at Mall Galleries. 

Discover the full series here.

Next Up...Tim Benson PROI RP NEAC


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Reflections from the Artist | Lucy McKie ROI

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"The ROI to me represents a shared passion for painting and real friendships. I hope that artists wishing to join the ROI will feel that too"


Lucy McKie ROI on visiting Mall Galleries as a teenager, the colours on her palette and what she wishes she'd known at the start of her career 

Lucy McKie ROI Irises in Bulb Vase £2,150

Born into an artistic family, Lucy decided early in life to be a painter. She was elected a member of the Royal Institute of Oil Painters in 2011 and serves as a council member for the society.  Lucy's work focuses on intricate detail and capturing beauty, natural light and form. She aims to reflect a serene and uplifting feeling within her compositions, and really capture a moment in time.


You and the ROI

What does the Royal Institute of Oil Painters mean to you?

I first visited the Mall Galleries as a teenager and always really hoped to exhibit a painting with the ROI one day - I didn’t expect to become a member. The ROI to me represents a shared passion for painting and real friendships. I hope that artists wishing to join the ROI will feel that too.

 

Why should artists want to exhibit with the Royal Institute of Oil Painters?

I feel that the ROI is a very positive, friendly society that wants to see a range of art from all kinds of painters. All the members have a real enthusiasm for the medium and are very passionate about encouraging other artists.

 

Why should people want to buy art from the Royal Institute of Oil Painters?

If you love oil paintings, the ROI has a broad and eclectic range of styles and subjects to choose from. You can see a very wide and varied choice of art in one show.

June Mendoza AO OBE RP ROI HON SWA David Morgan Hewitt

Past or present, what artist from the ROI do you most admire?

June Mendoza is someone who I have admired for as long as I can remember. I love her work, her wonderful quality and amazing skill. Her portraiture always captures sitters perfectly.

 

What is your favourite work in this year’s exhibition?

My favourite painting in the show this year is “Late Snow, The Farm” by Michael John Ashcroft AROI. It’s very subtle, thoughtful and atmospheric. The colours are beautiful.

Michael John Ashcroft AROI Late Snow, The Farm, £1,650

Your Materials

What paints make up your palette?

I use the Winsor and Newton Artists Range. The colours that I use most frequently are Titanium White, Raw Sienna, Burnt Sienna, Raw Umber, French Ultramarine, Payne’s Gray, Yellow Ochre, Winsor Yellow, Winsor Violet, Winsor Orange, Cadmium Red and Sap Green.

 

What framer do you use and do you always use the same framer?

I use a local framer that is based near me, and I nearly always have frames that are white or off white, as they seem to distract less from the painting.

 

What is your favourite art supplies store?

I love the bespoke canvasses made by Jackson's Art. They are beautifully made. I tend to get a lot of my art supplies from Jackson’s Art.


You, Your Work and Your Studio

What gallery did you first sell work at?

For many years I used to mainly do portraiture commissions so I think it was actually quite a long time until I starting selling work in a gallery.

 

Where do you produce your best work?

I do all of my work in the studio. I like to build the paintings up steadily and spend a lot of time on detail, so it’s the best place to quietly work on the paintings gradually.

Lucy McKie ROI Still Life with Late Summer Light

Do you have any rituals or routines when preparing and starting a painting?

I always spend a lot of time sketching the initial composition, and changing things around until I’m happy enough to start in paint. I’ve noticed that if I think the painting will be quite a challenge, I’ll find myself avoiding starting the actual painting and distracting myself with all kinds of other things I think need doing!

 

Where is your studio and what’s it like?

My studio is very small and if I’m honest, not very tidy. It is filled with canvasses and all sorts of bits and bobs I’ve collected over the years. Certainly not one of the lovely spacious studios that I see other artists painting in!


Advice

What advice would you give a young artist starting out or wanting to join the ROI?

Go to the annual exhibition and have a really good honest look at the show. Then do what you do as well as you can and keep on submitting. We’ve all faced many rejections and it is hard, but it’s also part of the process.

What is important is that you continue to paint and keep your own uniqueness, because ultimately that is what will stand out. It is essential to love what you do.

Keep painting and if you can, talk to the members and realise that everyone shares the love of painting and understands the challenges - the ROI is a very friendly group.

 

What do you know now that you wish you’d known at the start of your career?

That virtually everyone has times of self-doubt and impostor syndrome even if they pretend they don’t! I thought I was the only one until I started to get to know so many artists and realised it can happen to us all.

Perhaps we do need it to an extent to assess our work truthfully, but you also need to love the process and have faith in what you are doing.

 

Discover the Royal Institute of Oil Painters Annual Exhibition 2020



'Reflections from the Artist' is an ongoing series of advice from and insight into the practice of artists who exhibit at Mall Galleries. 

Discover the full series here.

Next Up... John Walsom ROI ARSMA


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Image credit

Lucy McKie ROI