Buy Art | Buy Now

Find out more about the art and artists on Buy Art | Buy Now, Mall Galleries' online gallery

Curator's Choice: Paul Benney

'Empty Chair' by Fleur Yearsley

Paul Benney is an acclaimed British artist whose work is housed in public and private collections around the world. Most recently, Benney exhibited the large-scale installation ‘Speaking in Tongues’ at the 57th Venice Art Biennale. Having previously served as a judge for the Columbia Threadneedle Prize, who better to take us through their favourite artworks from this year’s exhibition, and Mall Galleries Buy Art | Buy Now?



Browse Paul's choices now

 

A selection from Buy Art | Buy Now...

 

Fleur Yearsley

Empty Chair

Yearsley’s nod to Rothko’s colour fields and the delicate but insistent horizontals of Diebenkorn, combined with the strong poetic resonance of an empty chair, renders this work incredibly compelling to its viewer.

Fleur Yearsley, Empty Chair

Kris Lock

Synthesiser 

I am drawn to the references in Lock’s work, which has much in common with several artists I admire. The subtle but distinct allegiances to the graphic qualities of Patrick Caulfield and Hockney, and the faux surfaces of Richard Artschwager, have coalesced in such a way that Synthesiser remains original, with no sense of appropriation.

Kris Lock, Synthesiser

Roxana Halls

Yellow Room

In Yellow Room, Halls offsets formal colour and compositional decisions with off-kilter, surrealistic scenarios to engage the viewer.

Roxana Halls, Yellow Room

Renata Adela

Shafted

Adela has created a strange corporeal hybrid, which registers as a powerful metaphor speaking to the causal and teleological sources of Human Agency, as well as giving us pause to consider the philosophical implications raised by the Shakespearean notion of 'this mortal coil'.

Renata Adela, Shafted

Tim Patrick

Tiles

Patrick’s unpretentious and deceptively random compositions are curiously seductive. They imply narrative without imposing one; they suggest rather than explain.

Tim Patrick, Tiles

 

...and Paul's Picks from this year's Columbia Threadneedle Prize.

 

Sarah Ball

AC11

Ball is a master of compositional understatement and psychological insight, and in AC11, she continues to delight with her subdued palette and restricted tonal range.

Sarah Ball, AC11

Browse Paul's choices now

Going Global with Artsy

Artsy

Mall Galleries recently forged a new partnership with Artsy, the world’s largest online database of contemporary art. Since publicly launching in 2012, Artsy has been transforming the global art market, making it more accessible by helping artists and galleries to connect with buyers and art lovers internationally.

Discover Mall Galleries on Artsy now



You can use Artsy to follow your favourite artists and galleries (and discover new favourites), to purchase works, find the latest exhibitions and art news, read compelling articles aimed at both artists and art-lovers, and to make new creative connections worldwide. FBA exhibitions at Mall Galleries will now be shared on Artsy, and we will also host exclusive online-only exhibitions through Artsy, such as the current Flora Selection. This is a great way to expand the galleries’ audience, and through this, to raise the profile of our artists on a global level.  

Anne-Marie Butlin, Garden Wall

In a recent interview the Founder and CEO of Artsy, Clive Cleveland, said: “today, the vast majority of art sales are within the same city, whereas the average distance between buyer and seller on Artsy is 2,400 miles; we’re creating a whole new market”. Artsy’s algorithm enables users to easily search for works and artists, based on specifications such as medium, subject matter, and affiliated art movement. This search engine allows masterworks to be seen alongside contemporary works by emerging artists, effectively democratising a hitherto exclusive market.

This is fantastic news for both new and experienced art collectors, who gain access to a transparent and easily-searchable worldwide platform with works for any budget, and with in-built guidance on how to buy. It is also changing the game for the artist, whose audience now has a one-stop shop for seeing the individual’s past and future exhibitions, their affiliated galleries, profile, related content such as news features, and most importantly their available works.

Charlotte Sorapure, Love Song

As the sale of Art moves increasingly into a digital forum, Mall Galleries is confident that Artsy will be an invaluable partner for collectors, artists, and galleries. So, check out Artsy; follow Mall Galleries; explore our Flora exhibition; find and follow your favourite Mall Galleries artists, and see who else you discover! 

Discover Mall Galleries on Artsy now



Peggy Cozzi's Abstract Worlds

'Constellation' abstract oil painting by Peggy Cozzi

Peggy Cozzi is an abstract artist working in oils, whose improvisatory process facilitates fluid mark-making in a soft palette, where colours are juxtaposed to aesthetically please and conceptually arrest the viewer.

Browse the whole of the Peggy Cozzi's Collection now



A dynamic sense of movement and a rich textural quality are essential elements of Peggy Cozzi's latest works, which we have selected to feature as the first Reception Selection of 2018. We are furthermore delighted to announce that Peggy Cozzi’s Selection commences an all-female line-up for the coming year, with wildlife printmaker, Beatrice Forshall, and still life painter, Lucy McKie, to follow.

Peggy Cozzi, Passage

Each Reception Selection acts upon our intimate exhibition space to create a new and unique atmosphere at Carlton House Terrace; in the case of Peggy Cozzi, the atmosphere is unconstrained, full of fluid possibility and vigour – a perfect antidote to the regimented bustle of central London.

“I create from an awareness that everything is in flux”, says the artist, “and I hope to retain that sense of openness-to-change, even in my resolved works. My paintings never resemble closed objects, but I calibrate their openness carefully.” The openness of Cozzi’s work hovers like a question mark, inviting the viewer into the production of meaning.

A significant interlocutor in this experiential engagement is colour. When asked about the impact of colour on the viewer, Cozzi cites Derek Jarman’s argument in his book, Chroma, that colours hum with the associations accrued throughout the lived experience of humankind.

Peggy Cozzi, Night Drive

“Instead of prescribing meaning to colours, I am interested in the multiple resonances each colour has, both at a social and individual level. I hope my paintings tap into the experiencer’s associations, either psychologically or emotionally, because I feel those resonances myself.”

Cozzi is inspired to paint by a love of the medium, an inspiration which becomes self-generating as one painting prompts the next. This creative motor is evident in works such as ‘Constellation’ and ‘Night Drive’, where the paint is energetically displaced in confident arcing strokes which proliferate and extend across canvases.

Peggy Cozzi, Constellation

“For me, painting is a performative act, similar to dancing or playing music”, says Cozzi. These cross-disciplinary analogues reflect the artist’s diverse sources of inspiration. The seed of this Reception Selection was planted during the artist’s commute to her new studio, which takes Cozzi through the stunning coastline and hills of West Dorset.

“The journey fills me with optimism, and this sense of positive movement is diffused through my latest works”, she says. “I would listen to music, observe my surroundings, and contemplate my own mental landscape, becoming a mediator for this external and internal information.” Cozzi describes the resulting paintings as “internal landscapes” which evoke this symbiotic movement and potential.

Peggy Cozzi, Detour 2

Cozzi’s Selection will be exhibited in our reception space at 17 Carlton House Terrace from now until the end of May. Pay us a visit to discover these wonderful works in the flesh, and find them online at Buy Art | Buy Now.



Browse the whole of the Peggy Cozzi's Collection now

Director's Choice: Lewis McNaught

'Olive Tree and Moon' by Miriam Escofet

Mall Galleries' Director, Lewis McNaught selects his new choices for the new year on Buy Art | Buy Now. 


Browse Lewis's choices now

 

Peggy Cozzi

Broken Journey

I get transfixed by colour. The confident sweep of  Peggy Cozzi's brushwork and the textural effect of her applied colours (was the subtlety of this combination deliberate or is it fortuitous?) combine to make this little work a gem! Yes, it’s too small to hang over the fireplace, but hung with devotion, it will always excite the eye and imagination.

Peggy Cozzi, Broken Journey

Sarah Spencer

Verrucola, Tuscany

No lover of figurative painting who visits Italy today can fail to be moved by the ‘spiritual’ significance of Tuscany as the ‘cradle’ of Western art. Sarah Spencer treads lightly but reverently through this modest Tuscan interior. It doesn’t shout ‘architectural study’ or ‘history lesson’. Instead, it’s a quiet and personal reflection on encountering a divine little space that excited her attention.

Sarah Spencer NEAC, Verrucola, Tuscany

Michael Jules Lang

West Wittering III

I’ve holidayed at West Wittering since I was a child, and I keep getting drawn back to its massive skies and wide-open beaches. The stark contrasts in this vivid oil study by Michael Jules Lang of the grey sky (I remember many of those), the darkening water, and the sodden colour of the sandy beach attracted me. I particularly like the spontaneity and immediacy of Lang’s brushwork.

Michael Jules Lang, West Wittering III

Jeanette Hayes

Pink Gardens

I wasn’t surprised to see a major work by Jeannette Hayes, President of The Pastel Society, sell so quickly at the 2017 RA Summer Exhibition. She paints powerful, expressive abstract and figurative subjects with an honest, uncompromising technique. She is also widely admired - and rightly so - for the way she deploys her colour and tones. ‘Pink Gardens’ stands out as one of her most intriguing landscape studies combined with a kind of abstract ‘expressionism’.

Jeanette Hayes, Pink Gardens 

Miriam Escofet

Olive Tree and Moon

Although I seem to be drawn more and more towards abstraction, I find this painting, which is almost hyper-realistic, very exciting. Not just because there’s an olive tree involved (although the knobbly, sinewy trunk of an ancient olive tree is always mysterious and inviting), but because its surreal character excites the imagination. What kind of dialogue is the moon having with the tree? What is it telling us about the future? I love paintings that surprise me and make me think.

Miriam Escofet, Olive Tree and Moon

Michèle Jaffé-Pearce

Over and Beyond

In Over and Beyond, Michele has achieved a perfect balance of colour, tone and space. Its fluidity suggests randomness, but she hasn’t achieved this result by accident. Instead, the colours are juxtaposed carefully and deliberately to maximise the impact of the whole. You don’t need to look for forms or subject within the spaces; the artist is inviting you to enjoy the same emotion she’s experiencing. It will go on delivering much pleasure.

Michèle Jaffé-Pearce, Over and Beyond


Browse Lewis's choices now

 


Artist Spotlight : Kenny McKendry

'Self Portrait' oil painting by Kenny McKendry

Finding time for a moment of reflection before his three-year-old son’s birthday party, Irish painter Kenny McKendry tells Mall Galleries' Beatrice Bowles-Bray about his love of painting the landscapes of his birthplace, his acclaimed career as a book illustrator, and the artistic and familial influences which inform his work.

Browse all of the works by Kenny McKendry on Buy Art | Buy Now



“I’m sat looking out at a calm, flat sea”, McKendry says when asked if he has found a comfortable place to speak. “It's steely grey and there are lovely pink flecks dancing along the bay.” Mckendry is back on the coast of his native Northern Ireland after many years living as an illustrator in England; the artist remained in Brighton after moving there to study a degree in Illustration. “I’ve always lived by the sea. I think you know where you are when you're near the sea”, McKendry reflects; “it's very grounding”.

Kenny McKendry, Winter Sun, Whiterocks

On leaving university, the artist enjoyed a ten-year career in illustration and design, during which time, his stand-out commission was a series of award-winning book covers for John Steinbeck novels. “Through this work I became familiar with Steinbeck’s son, Thom. I painted Thom and we had a lovely relationship. He was very interested in art, and we shared a common connection with Ireland; John’s maternal grandfather was from Ballykelly, near Derry. I visited the Steinbeck family grave when I received the commission, and it was brilliant to know that John Steinbeck also visited the site while researching ‘East of Eden’.”

 

As technological developments led the art world and the digital world to be increasingly integrated, self-confessed technophobe McKendry decided it was time for a change. He went home to Northern Ireland, found a gallery, and “met a girl”. McKendry now devotes his time to his family, and to painting the Irish landscapes he loves. “I feel free when I’m painting landscapes” he says. “There’s no pressure to capture a likeness, or to please a sitter; I’m able to respond to a space in my own way.”

Kenny McKendry, Easter, Dunguire Castle

Kenny McKendry works across a range of genres, from portraiture to equine painting, but his passion lies in landscapes. “I begin my pieces out of doors, then work them up in the studio. When I work en plein air the light can change rapidly. Looking out of my window now, the morning light is hitting bracken around the lighthouse in the bay, turning the bracken a blazing red and benighting the surrounding headland; that’s a paintable image, but it’s going to change any second.”

 

“I would like people to feel a connection with the spaces I paint”, the artists says. “I am continually negotiating that balance between capturing the soul of a place, and rendering locations recognisably.” In this pursuit, McKendry takes inspiration from such artists as William Langson Lathrop and Jules Bastien-Lepage. “Seeing my first Langson Lathrop work felt like hearing a great piece of music for the first time, when it rings true with you, and you feel yourself and that musician to be kindred spirits.” Langson Lathrop was an American tonalist painter who founded the New Hope Pennsylvania Impressionist Colony. “I was very interested in his style of composition”, McKendry says, “and his use of light seemed reminiscent of the peculiar quality of light in Ireland”.

Kenny McKendry, On Return from the Home of Henry James I, Rye

Alongside his artistic influences, Kenny McKendry looks to the people closest to him to energise his work: “my young son inspires me so much, although he often asks me to paint things like Darth Vader”, the artist admits. “Before a child starts trying to make things look like things, they’re just enjoying making marks, and that’s where he is at the moment. I imagine that artists like Picasso were trying to get back to that.”

 

As I leave McKendry to contemplate his native coastline, and to prepare for his son’s birthday celebrations, it is clear that this artist has returned to where his heart resides, in relation to both his life and work, and that the landscape paintings he is now producing are embodiments of this homecoming.

Kenny McKendry, Self Portrait with Irish Arts


Browse all of the works by Kenny McKendry on Buy Art | Buy Now

FBA Prizewinners 2017

'Bee' oil painting by Bernadett Timko

We’re delighted that so many of the artists we selected for Buy Art | Buy Now were recognised with prizes and awards in Society Annual Exhibitions in 2017. Many of the FBA Societies offer valuable prizes to the artists exhibiting in their Annual Exhibitions, to reward talent and support individuals in their ongoing careers. Below you can see a selection of the winning artists and their works, available to purchase on Buy Art | Buy Now.

Browse the whole of the FBA Prizewinners 2017 Collection now



Twenty-three-year-old Bernadett Timko received The Prince of Wales’ Award for Portrait Drawing. Timko is currently studying portrait painting and figurative sculpture at the Heatherley School of Fine Art. She is a prolific painter of great promise, and at Buy At | Buy Now we are delighted to receive new works from her regularly, such as the self-portrait, ‘B II’.

Bernadett Timko, B II

Frances Bell received first prize in the Royal Institute of Oil Painters Winsor and Newton Young Artist Awards, recognising emerging artists’ creativity and talent in oils. Bell is greatly inspired by juxtapositions of cultivated and wild spaces and wildlife, as evidenced by her works on Buy Art | Buy Now, such as ‘Cattle in the Morning Mist’.

Frances Bell, Cattle in the Morning Mist

Tony Allain PS received two prizes in 2017; the Artists & Illustrators Award, and the Schmincke Award. Allain lives and works in the ancient seaside town of Marazion in West Cornwall. Marine works such as ‘Bosham Sunset’ are a testament to the artist’s dedicated observation and representation of coastal life.

Tony Allain PS, Bosham Sunset

Benjamin Hope received the ROI Winsor and Newton Non-Member Award. Hope is a self-taught artist who took the road less-travelled by studying Mathematics and Physics at Cambridge University to PhD level. His latest works on Buy Art | Buy Now demonstrate the artist’s dual love of urban and coastal scenes.

Benjamin Hope, Penzance Promenade Sunset 1

Pete ‘the street’ Brown is well-known and well-loved in the British contemporary art community. In 2017, the artist received the New English Art Club’s Critics’ Prize and the NEAC Winsor and Newton Award. His plein air works are currently exhibited in Mall Galleries’ Reception Selection.

Peter Brown, The Old Bailey

Daniel Shadbolt received The Royal Society of Portrait Painters Non-Member’s Prize. Shadbolt presents domestic settings in oils, combining colour and tone to create a realism in his spaces, regardless of whether they are populated by a human figure. The expressive brush strokes and contrasting colour palette of ‘Guitar’ exemplifies the artist’s original style.

Daniel Shadbolt, Guitar

Annie Boisseau received the Royal Society of British Artists’ Winsor and Newton Award for Painting. Boisseau, who teaches Art at the University of Surrey, considers her style to be a contemporary interpretation of Romantic landscape painting. Works like ‘Cielo Roto’ are inspired by an emotional response to the natural world, and investigate the often-transient qualities of time, space, memories, and emotions through expressive semi-abstract painting.

Annie Boisseau, Cielo Roto

Harriet Mead PSWLA received the Society of Wild Life Artists’ Langford Press 3D Award. Mead works with scrap metal, scavenging old tools and discarded items from farm yards and sheds to render the musculature of her characterful wild life subjects. The dynamism of ‘Chasing Hares’ is indicative of the artist’s alchemical transformation of waste material into award-winning wildlife art.

Harriet Mead, Chasing Hares


Browse the whole of the FBA Prizewinners 2017 Collection now

Let It Snow - Buy Art | Buy Now

'Bear and Rusty Pine' acrylic painting by Darren Rees

This week’s nationwide cold snap may have halted planes and trains, caused power outages, and closed schools, but it hasn’t deterred these intrepid artists. Recent flurries have inspired a corresponding flurry of artistic responses, and here’s a selection of our favourites, produced by Darren Rees SWLA, Roy Wright PS, Julian Halsby RBA, Lucie Geffré and Michael Harrison.

Browse the whole of the Let It Snow Collection now



The collection of acrylic paintings by acclaimed wildlife artist, Darren Rees SWLA, takes us around the globe; to Scotland’s mountains, Wyoming’s famous Yellowstone National Park, and the Norwegian archipelago. In Bear and Rusty Pine, warm shades invite the viewer to engage with Rees’ intimate depiction of a lone brown bear. In Blue Ice, Bears and Driftwood, acrylics are contrastingly employed to add surreal vibrancy to the composition. The vast glacier rings with a pearlescent blue which is mirrored in the pebbles on the shore beneath, and the intimacy of the previous work is answered with the aloof movement of the polar bears out of sight.

Darren Rees SWLA, Bear and Rusty Pine

These new works by Roy Wright render a snow-carpeted Richmond Park, with all the bare majesty of its ancient woodland in winter-time. Charcoal is the ideal medium for capturing the austerity of these scenes, and for accenting the dynamism of the trees’ gnarled trunks and spindly, snow-dusted branches.

Roy Wright PS, Winter Silver Birches

Art historian, Julian Halsby, uses oils to respond creatively to the reflective qualities of snow. The blanketed patchwork of fields in Snow near Cerne Abbas pick up icy blue tints from the brilliant winter sky above. In contrast, First Snow, Sherborne imbibes warmth through the artist’s use of amber hues, vibrant greens, and pale pink accents in the snow. Ice-encased vegetation waves white against the river Yeo, and the scene conjures images of winter walks, replete with woolly-socked walking boots and cold pink noses protruding from hats and scarves.

Julian Halsby RBA, Snow near Cerne Abbas

Lucie Geffré’s Barn Owl combines painting and drawing to create a wintry dreamscape. In AD 731, St Bede compared the life of man to ‘the swift flight of a bird through the banqueting hall in winter’; the fire may blaze within but winter storms rage without. This metaphor of winter as the unknown manifests in Geffré’s work in the swirl of muted colours which makes up the background, to a formlessness which nonetheless gestures to landscape and form.

Lucie Geffré, Barn Owl

Michael Harrison employs muted shades of brown, yellow and cream to evoke a sense of the landscape in hibernation in Frozen Lake, where expressive strokes evoke a merging of sky, land and water. Village in Snow is accented with a spectrum of pastel colours, depicting, as in Julian Halsby’s works, the reflectivity of snow. A church spire stands out black in the background, and the artist employs swathes of russet, and patches of bright yellow to draw the viewer’s eye across the scene.

Michael Harrison, Vilage in snow


Browse the whole of the Let It Snow Collection now

Image credit

Julian Halsby RBA, Snow near Cerne Abbas

Sarah Spencer’s Winter Skies

After “defrosting” from a chilly afternoon spent sketching for a new commission in her local environs of Whitstable, Sarah Spencer NEAC tells Mall Galleries’ Beatrice Bowles-Bray about landscape painting for commission and pleasure, and why winter is her favourite season for painting

 

Browse all work by Sarah Spencer available on Buy Art | Buy Now


“I will often make a commission my own by focusing on the sky”, Sarah begins. “I have always been drawn to painting skies, and that’s why winter is the best time of year for me. Some painters love a summer sky, but I prefer the drama of wintry weather.” Sarah is particularly fond of the cool palette of a North Norfolk winter. “I spent lots of time there when I was younger, and you just don’t get bigger skies” she says. “Those early impressions have stayed with me.”

In rendering these landscapes, beloved since childhood, Sarah Spencer is unusual in her focus on tone over colour: “My artistic career began with drawing rather than painting, and I think this legacy endures in my tendency towards monochromism. I am definitely not a colourist; my paintings are tonal, and that feels fitting for the scenes I love to paint.”

Sarah Spencer NEAC, Distant Boys and Boats, Southwold

Although Sarah’s paintings are completed in the studio, the artist begins en plein air. “I will spend several days out in a landscape, doing a lot of drawing”, she says. “Charcoal works perfectly for this, because it moves so quickly on the paper - unless of course it’s raining, when it doesn’t work at all! The priority for me in these first sketches is getting the tonal relationships right, because that’s where the drama lies. I also do small oil sketches outside, and although these rarely end up in the finished work, something about the challenge of painting out of doors forces me to paint in a different way, which I really value.”

“To see me out there in the elements, it may look like I’m losing the battle, but these plein air sketches produce something unattainable in the comfort of a studio. The brush stroke you make when you are trying to make sense of what’s in front of you, amid wind and rain, is quite unique. Inside the studio it’s much easier to overwork things.”

Spencer gathers these preparatory sketches like fragments which, as with her favourite locations, she revisits and re-appropriates for different works at different stages of her career. “Each painting will typically involve five preparatory studies, and a sketch from years ago could easily come together with a sky I painted today to form a new work. In addition to this I do lots of glazes.” With characteristic modesty, Sarah likens this technique of accumulative splicing to a jigsaw, while devotees of her landscapes see them as palimpsests of experience and impression, consolidating different temporalities, perspectives, and even periods in the artist’s life.

Because her works unify a history of impressions rather than presenting a single moment, Sarah faces a challenge when it comes to commissioned work: “I like to return to the same locations to paint, but with commissions, I will often be painting someone else’s special place. This is not always easy, but I love it when a commission gives me the opportunity to discover something special in a location I might not otherwise have visited.”

The seascapes of Southwold which are currently available on Mall Galleries’ Buy Art | Buy Now platform are indicative of this happy discovering. “These were paintings I did for my own pleasure whilst working on a commission to paint Southwold pier. Painting in such a public location is unusual for me, so I went off piste to do these paintings, and to find that hook, that certain aspect of the place that I identified with personally, which would then give the finished commission its character.”

Sarah Spencer NEAC, Southwold Beach Sketch

If Spencer was commissioned to create a winter landscape with a subject entirely of her choosing, the artist asserts that she would paint Norfolk, “perhaps Holkham or Scolt Head Island”, she says. “The skies from there are fantastic. I would have loved to move there, but Whitstable faces the same way, the sun still sets over the sea, and it’s that much nearer to London for visiting galleries.”

Discussing the advantages and disadvantages of living in a remote area like Whitstable, Sarah Spencer, long-time member of the New English Art Club, praises the benefits of being part of a close community of artists. Laughing, the artist says that, “it’s lovely to be in a room full of people talking about things like how to stop an easel falling over in the wind. You don’t have those conversations outside of groups like the NEAC. Not living in London, it’s harder to connect with people who share your interests, so the Club has been brilliant.”

From the stimulating influence of her fellow artists to the daily inspiration of her local seas and skies, Sarah Spencer surrounds herself with the things she loves. This depth of feeling and enduring attachment to place becomes what is most captivating in her art.

Browse all work by Sarah Spencer available on Buy Art | Buy Now 



By Beatrice Bowles-Bray

Image credit

Boys and Boats Suffolk by Sarah Spencer NEAC

Curator's Choice: Beatrice Bowles-Bray

'Stoat with Rabbit in Bluebells' oil painting by David Bennett

Beatrice Bowles-Bray is the latest addition to the Mall Galleries team, who will be working on all things digital. Here Beatrice walks us through five paintings from Buy Art | Buy Now that she would have on her wall.



Bernadett Timko

Paula - £600

Bernadett Timko is undoubtedly an artist to watch, so it’s a good idea to invest in her work now. Timko’s striking use of colour, darkness, and luminescent inflections are redolent of Egon Schiele and create an incredible sense of mood, narrative and character in her portraits. Paula is a fine example of the artist’s work, where reds, greens and oranges are confidently juxtaposed, and the eye is drawn to the light dancing on a solitary hooped earring.


David Bennett SWLA

Stoat and Rabbit in Bluebells - £690

Looking at this work, I can’t help but share in the stoat’s sense of pride as it strides homeward victorious through vibrant bluebell meadows, rabbit inmouth. Head held high, gait confident and loping: the centre of a glorious whorl of colour. This painting is one of a series of new wildlife works by David Bennett which explore the stunning phosphorescence of colours in nature.


Haidee-Jo Summers ROI ARSMA

Autumn Colour - £585

By painting en plein air, Haidee-Jo Summers captures something essential about the character of Autumn. Although this beautiful new work was painted in Lincolnshire, to my eye it evokes the graceful, lilting descent of yellowing leaves as they spiral to the ground here on the Mall. The artist’s light touch and empathic treatment render this rural scene with all the colour and glancing light of the season.


Tony Allain PS

Sparks Lake, Oregon - £2,900

Tony Allain’s depiction of Sparks Lake uses expressive pastel strokes to show light playing upon treetops and the surface of the water, and the rapid movement of the artist’s eye as it flits from impression to impression. The result is vivid and vital, with rich hues and great depth created by contrasting brightness and darkness. This larger work is the ideal statement piece for a communal space.


Moira Huntly PPPS RI RSMA

With Homage to the TM 620 Marine Diesel Engine - £1,500

Where arts and sciences intersect, the results can be compelling, and this engaging mixed media piece by Moira Huntly is a prime example. Honouring her Scottish roots by employing colour in the tradition of the Scottish Colourists, this work based on technical drawings attains a degree of abstraction through its palette of teals and ochres. Blending pleasing simplicity with technical accuracy, this is a piece which offers the onlooker more with each viewing.


Browse Beatrice's choices now

 


Image credit

David Bennett Stoat with Rabbit in Bluebells

Christmas Curator's Choice: John Deston

Chocolates by Robbie Wraith RP

Mall Galleries Gallery Manager, John Deston walks us through five paintings from Buy Art | Buy Now that he would have on his wall.

 

 

Browse John's Christmas choices now

 

Ridgeway by Jeanette Hayes PPS

We are delighted that Jeanette Hayes is our new President of the Pastel Society. Her work perfectly blends the boundary between figurative art and abstraction, none more so than Ridgeway. For me, this piece is almost panoramic. It calls to mind a country walk in autumn, full of earthy colours and leafless trees swaying in the fresh wind. Jeanette can imply these details with a rough line, using the powdery nature of pastels to capture the quintessential landscape.

Chocolates by Robbie Wraith RP

I have included this Robbie Wraith painting in my selection because we are entering the festive season. The contrast of the plain bowl and background with the brightly wrapped sweets fills me with excitement for all the treats and sweetmeats of the Christmas period. Robbie’s technique never ceases to impress me. He has an alchemical ability to add glimmers of light with a simple dashes pure white paint on the surface of the artwork.

A Couple of Rows of Leeks by June Berry NEAC

June Berry’s piece, … , is a delight to behold because of her use of colour. What I find so appealing about this rural autumnal scene, is the way the painting starts as a deep earthen purple at soil level, then lightens as your eyes read the work skyward. I enjoy the activity of the farmer planting his crops, balanced with the static scarecrow to the left of the work. The pink and orange trails leading up the hill hint at thousands of happy hikes in this familiar shrubby setting.

The Strand, Autumn by Benjamin Hope

I am drawn to this Ben Hope painting primarily because it is of the Strand - an area of London that I have walked down almost every day for years, throughout my time at Mall Galleries. It therefore holds a special place in my heart. Ben is well-known for painting en plein air. I admire his remarkable ability to capture his surroundings as they are, whatever the weather. I also find this work striking because slap bang in the centre of the canvas is a red traffic light, which distracts you from the hustle and bustle of the busy street. It is an unusual place to focus a painting, and really makes you stop and think.

Lion at Masai Mara by Simon Turvey SWLA

Simon Turvey is one of our most recognised stalwart members of the Society of Wildlife Artists. He is a master of realism, and his images of animals are almost portraits. His work treats wild beasts with such tenderness that they don human qualities and are really rather mesmerising. This lion is a perfect example of Simon’s skill at capturing the nature of an animal in paint. It is calm, noble and meticulously observed.  

Image credit

Chocolates by Robbie Wraith RP